Split-thickness skin grafting of the myelomeningocele defect: A subset at risk for late ulceration

Edward Luce, Steven W. Stigers, Keith D. Vandenbrink, John W. Walsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The appropriate method and timing of the management of the myelomeningocele defect have prompted considerable discussion. Use of split-thickness skin grafts acutely has accomplished wound closure with low morbidity and mortality. This study was designed to address the question of long-term suitability of the technique of split-thickness skin grafting of the myelomeningocele patient. The incidence of late and/or severe skin ulceration and the presence of gibbus deformity were correlated with the method of skin closure. Long-term follow-up revealed a higher incidence of chronic skin ulceration in the split-thickness skin graft group as compared with the primary closure group. All skin breakdowns appeared in the presence of a gibbus deformity, and gibbus deformity was more prevalent in the split-thickness skin graft group. The incidence of skin ulceration and gibbus deformity was site-dependent. A thoracic or thoracolumbar myelomeningocele repair with split-thickness skin graft was significantly more likely to be complicated by skin problems than the defect in the lumbar, lumbosacral, or sacral region. This relationship was secondary to the frequency of gibbus deformity in the more cephalad defects than defects caudad. A treatment plan is outlined that is based on the primary variable of the location of the myelomeningocele and secondarily by defect size.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-121
Number of pages6
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume87
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Meningomyelocele
Skin Transplantation
Skin
Transplants
Lumbosacral Region
Incidence
Sacrococcygeal Region
Thorax
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Split-thickness skin grafting of the myelomeningocele defect : A subset at risk for late ulceration. / Luce, Edward; Stigers, Steven W.; Vandenbrink, Keith D.; Walsh, John W.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 87, No. 1, 01.01.1991, p. 116-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Luce, Edward ; Stigers, Steven W. ; Vandenbrink, Keith D. ; Walsh, John W. / Split-thickness skin grafting of the myelomeningocele defect : A subset at risk for late ulceration. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 1991 ; Vol. 87, No. 1. pp. 116-121.
@article{3756b233b8b24cf38537215570408533,
title = "Split-thickness skin grafting of the myelomeningocele defect: A subset at risk for late ulceration",
abstract = "The appropriate method and timing of the management of the myelomeningocele defect have prompted considerable discussion. Use of split-thickness skin grafts acutely has accomplished wound closure with low morbidity and mortality. This study was designed to address the question of long-term suitability of the technique of split-thickness skin grafting of the myelomeningocele patient. The incidence of late and/or severe skin ulceration and the presence of gibbus deformity were correlated with the method of skin closure. Long-term follow-up revealed a higher incidence of chronic skin ulceration in the split-thickness skin graft group as compared with the primary closure group. All skin breakdowns appeared in the presence of a gibbus deformity, and gibbus deformity was more prevalent in the split-thickness skin graft group. The incidence of skin ulceration and gibbus deformity was site-dependent. A thoracic or thoracolumbar myelomeningocele repair with split-thickness skin graft was significantly more likely to be complicated by skin problems than the defect in the lumbar, lumbosacral, or sacral region. This relationship was secondary to the frequency of gibbus deformity in the more cephalad defects than defects caudad. A treatment plan is outlined that is based on the primary variable of the location of the myelomeningocele and secondarily by defect size.",
author = "Edward Luce and Stigers, {Steven W.} and Vandenbrink, {Keith D.} and Walsh, {John W.}",
year = "1991",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/00006534-199101000-00018",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "87",
pages = "116--121",
journal = "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery",
issn = "0032-1052",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Split-thickness skin grafting of the myelomeningocele defect

T2 - A subset at risk for late ulceration

AU - Luce, Edward

AU - Stigers, Steven W.

AU - Vandenbrink, Keith D.

AU - Walsh, John W.

PY - 1991/1/1

Y1 - 1991/1/1

N2 - The appropriate method and timing of the management of the myelomeningocele defect have prompted considerable discussion. Use of split-thickness skin grafts acutely has accomplished wound closure with low morbidity and mortality. This study was designed to address the question of long-term suitability of the technique of split-thickness skin grafting of the myelomeningocele patient. The incidence of late and/or severe skin ulceration and the presence of gibbus deformity were correlated with the method of skin closure. Long-term follow-up revealed a higher incidence of chronic skin ulceration in the split-thickness skin graft group as compared with the primary closure group. All skin breakdowns appeared in the presence of a gibbus deformity, and gibbus deformity was more prevalent in the split-thickness skin graft group. The incidence of skin ulceration and gibbus deformity was site-dependent. A thoracic or thoracolumbar myelomeningocele repair with split-thickness skin graft was significantly more likely to be complicated by skin problems than the defect in the lumbar, lumbosacral, or sacral region. This relationship was secondary to the frequency of gibbus deformity in the more cephalad defects than defects caudad. A treatment plan is outlined that is based on the primary variable of the location of the myelomeningocele and secondarily by defect size.

AB - The appropriate method and timing of the management of the myelomeningocele defect have prompted considerable discussion. Use of split-thickness skin grafts acutely has accomplished wound closure with low morbidity and mortality. This study was designed to address the question of long-term suitability of the technique of split-thickness skin grafting of the myelomeningocele patient. The incidence of late and/or severe skin ulceration and the presence of gibbus deformity were correlated with the method of skin closure. Long-term follow-up revealed a higher incidence of chronic skin ulceration in the split-thickness skin graft group as compared with the primary closure group. All skin breakdowns appeared in the presence of a gibbus deformity, and gibbus deformity was more prevalent in the split-thickness skin graft group. The incidence of skin ulceration and gibbus deformity was site-dependent. A thoracic or thoracolumbar myelomeningocele repair with split-thickness skin graft was significantly more likely to be complicated by skin problems than the defect in the lumbar, lumbosacral, or sacral region. This relationship was secondary to the frequency of gibbus deformity in the more cephalad defects than defects caudad. A treatment plan is outlined that is based on the primary variable of the location of the myelomeningocele and secondarily by defect size.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025976361&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025976361&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00006534-199101000-00018

DO - 10.1097/00006534-199101000-00018

M3 - Article

C2 - 1984255

AN - SCOPUS:0025976361

VL - 87

SP - 116

EP - 121

JO - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

JF - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

SN - 0032-1052

IS - 1

ER -