Spontaneous language production in mild aphasia

Relationship to left prefrontal glucose hypometabolism

J. Illes, R. Dennings, E. Metter, D. Dennings, C. Jackson, W. R. Hanson, D. Kempler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Samples of spontaneous language production of twelve anomic aphasic patients were analyzed for temporal structure (patterns of hesitations, self-corrections, aborted phrases and comments), semantic structure (occurrence of paraphasias, neologisms, and use of open and closed class phrases) and syntactic structure (complexity). All subjects had a thromboembolic or haemorrhagic event involving the left hemisphere, and were divided into two groups: a prefrontal ‘asymmetric’ group with left prefrontal hypometabolism, and a prefrontal ‘symmetric’ group with normal left/right frontal metabolic ratios as measured by a [F18]-fluorodeoxyglucose (18-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scan. Structural lesions of patients in the asymmetric group tended to extend deep in the neostriatum and involved posterior superior temporal gyrus, while the symmetric group had primarily temporo-parietal lesions. The neurolinguistic features of spontaneous language production dissociating the two groups were: (1) an increase in the occurrence of silent hesitations between mandatory phrases, an increase in the occurrence of self-corrections, and a decrease in syntactic complexity in language samples of the prefrontal asymmetric group; and (2) a relative increase in silent heistations preceding optional phrases in the language samples of the prefrontal symmetric group. The results suggest that left prefrontal hypometabolism produces a profile of deficits consistent with prefrontal pathology, i.e. although patients in both groups exhibited marked word finding difficulties, patients in the prefrontal asymmetric group showed additional difficulty with planning and formulating their verbal language. High correlations between frontal glucose metabolic rates and the neostriatal lesions in these patients lend further support to the theory that an interplay between frontal cortex and neostriatal regions is essential for fluent and well-formed spontaneous language production.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-537
Number of pages11
JournalAphasiology
Volume3
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Aphasia
speech disorder
Language
Glucose
language
Group
Neostriatum
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18
Frontal Lobe
Semantics
Positron-Emission Tomography
Language Production
Pathology
pathology
Lesion
deficit
semantics
planning
Hesitation
Self-correction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Language and Linguistics
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • LPN and LVN

Cite this

Spontaneous language production in mild aphasia : Relationship to left prefrontal glucose hypometabolism. / Illes, J.; Dennings, R.; Metter, E.; Dennings, D.; Jackson, C.; Hanson, W. R.; Kempler, D.

In: Aphasiology, Vol. 3, No. 6, 01.01.1989, p. 527-537.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Illes, J, Dennings, R, Metter, E, Dennings, D, Jackson, C, Hanson, WR & Kempler, D 1989, 'Spontaneous language production in mild aphasia: Relationship to left prefrontal glucose hypometabolism', Aphasiology, vol. 3, no. 6, pp. 527-537. https://doi.org/10.1080/02687038908249020
Illes, J. ; Dennings, R. ; Metter, E. ; Dennings, D. ; Jackson, C. ; Hanson, W. R. ; Kempler, D. / Spontaneous language production in mild aphasia : Relationship to left prefrontal glucose hypometabolism. In: Aphasiology. 1989 ; Vol. 3, No. 6. pp. 527-537.
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