Staphylococcus Aureus Cellulitis: An Unusual Presentation

Paul M. Geunes, Jeffrey Brooks, Charles S. Huttula, Joan Chesney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus has long been known as one of the most virulent microbes, with capabilities that make it threatening in both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. It remains the most frequent cause of skin-structure and traumatic infections in the community.1 S. aureus infections in the maxillofacial region are likely to be associated with a known portal of entry, but this is not always the case.2 Once invasion occurs, the organism may produce virulent enzymes including coagulase, hyaluronidase, proteases, DNA-ase, lipases, hemolysins, and lysozyme as well as exotoxins.3 Markel et al4 point out that cellulitis associated with coagulase-positive staphylococci will often resolve without abscess formation. Hence, there is often no site from which to obtain specimens, making this infection a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. This report describes an infection in which the etiologic organism was identified as S. aureus. The source of the infection, however, remained unclear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)319-320
Number of pages2
JournalClinical Pediatrics
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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Cellulitis
Staphylococcus aureus
Infection
Coagulase
Community-Acquired Infections
Hemolysin Proteins
Hyaluronoglucosaminidase
Muramidase
Lipase
Staphylococcus
Abscess
Peptide Hydrolases
Skin
DNA
Enzymes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Staphylococcus Aureus Cellulitis : An Unusual Presentation. / Geunes, Paul M.; Brooks, Jeffrey; Huttula, Charles S.; Chesney, Joan.

In: Clinical Pediatrics, Vol. 33, No. 5, 01.01.1994, p. 319-320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Geunes, Paul M. ; Brooks, Jeffrey ; Huttula, Charles S. ; Chesney, Joan. / Staphylococcus Aureus Cellulitis : An Unusual Presentation. In: Clinical Pediatrics. 1994 ; Vol. 33, No. 5. pp. 319-320.
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