Staphylococcus aureus, including Community-Acquired Methicillin-resistant Saureus, in a Level III NICU

2001 to 2008

Divya Rana, Nazha Abughali, Deepak Kumar, Dennis M. Super, Michael R. Jacobs, Mary L. Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To determine epidemiology and clinical characteristics of infants with methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Study Design All NICU admissions (2001 to 2008) with any positive S. aureus culture were included as cases. Cases were further characterized as either colonized or infected with invasive disease. Results Four thousand three hundred four infants were admitted; 273 (6.3%) had at least one culture positive for S. aureus, including 198 with MSSA and 75 with MRSA. Invasive disease occurred in 23.2% of MSSA cases versus 29.3% MRSA (p = 0.298). Between the study periods 2001 to 2005 versus 2006 to 2008, the incidence of all MSSA cultures (colonization and invasive disease) decreased from 53.6 to 38.9/1000 admissions (p = 0.044), and that of MRSA increased from 13.7 to 24.77/1000 admissions (p = 0.010). The incidence of invasive MSSA (p = 0.49) and MRSA (p = 0.38) disease between the two periods remained similar. Infants with invasive MRSA versus MSSA had a longer duration of positive cultures (55 versus 19 days, p = 0.009). None of five available isolates collected prior to 2006 was characterized as USA300, but 11/21 isolates collected subsequently were USA300 (p = 0.053). Conclusion The incidence of MRSA (colonization and infection) nearly doubled during the study period coinciding with emergence of community-acquired MRSA USA300.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)401-408
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Perinatology
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 8 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Methicillin Resistance
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Staphylococcus aureus
Incidence
Methicillin
Epidemiology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Staphylococcus aureus, including Community-Acquired Methicillin-resistant Saureus, in a Level III NICU : 2001 to 2008. / Rana, Divya; Abughali, Nazha; Kumar, Deepak; Super, Dennis M.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Kumar, Mary L.

In: American Journal of Perinatology, Vol. 29, No. 6, 08.03.2012, p. 401-408.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Rana, Divya ; Abughali, Nazha ; Kumar, Deepak ; Super, Dennis M. ; Jacobs, Michael R. ; Kumar, Mary L. / Staphylococcus aureus, including Community-Acquired Methicillin-resistant Saureus, in a Level III NICU : 2001 to 2008. In: American Journal of Perinatology. 2012 ; Vol. 29, No. 6. pp. 401-408.
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abstract = "Objective To determine epidemiology and clinical characteristics of infants with methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Study Design All NICU admissions (2001 to 2008) with any positive S. aureus culture were included as cases. Cases were further characterized as either colonized or infected with invasive disease. Results Four thousand three hundred four infants were admitted; 273 (6.3{\%}) had at least one culture positive for S. aureus, including 198 with MSSA and 75 with MRSA. Invasive disease occurred in 23.2{\%} of MSSA cases versus 29.3{\%} MRSA (p = 0.298). Between the study periods 2001 to 2005 versus 2006 to 2008, the incidence of all MSSA cultures (colonization and invasive disease) decreased from 53.6 to 38.9/1000 admissions (p = 0.044), and that of MRSA increased from 13.7 to 24.77/1000 admissions (p = 0.010). The incidence of invasive MSSA (p = 0.49) and MRSA (p = 0.38) disease between the two periods remained similar. Infants with invasive MRSA versus MSSA had a longer duration of positive cultures (55 versus 19 days, p = 0.009). None of five available isolates collected prior to 2006 was characterized as USA300, but 11/21 isolates collected subsequently were USA300 (p = 0.053). Conclusion The incidence of MRSA (colonization and infection) nearly doubled during the study period coinciding with emergence of community-acquired MRSA USA300.",
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T1 - Staphylococcus aureus, including Community-Acquired Methicillin-resistant Saureus, in a Level III NICU

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AU - Rana, Divya

AU - Abughali, Nazha

AU - Kumar, Deepak

AU - Super, Dennis M.

AU - Jacobs, Michael R.

AU - Kumar, Mary L.

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N2 - Objective To determine epidemiology and clinical characteristics of infants with methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Study Design All NICU admissions (2001 to 2008) with any positive S. aureus culture were included as cases. Cases were further characterized as either colonized or infected with invasive disease. Results Four thousand three hundred four infants were admitted; 273 (6.3%) had at least one culture positive for S. aureus, including 198 with MSSA and 75 with MRSA. Invasive disease occurred in 23.2% of MSSA cases versus 29.3% MRSA (p = 0.298). Between the study periods 2001 to 2005 versus 2006 to 2008, the incidence of all MSSA cultures (colonization and invasive disease) decreased from 53.6 to 38.9/1000 admissions (p = 0.044), and that of MRSA increased from 13.7 to 24.77/1000 admissions (p = 0.010). The incidence of invasive MSSA (p = 0.49) and MRSA (p = 0.38) disease between the two periods remained similar. Infants with invasive MRSA versus MSSA had a longer duration of positive cultures (55 versus 19 days, p = 0.009). None of five available isolates collected prior to 2006 was characterized as USA300, but 11/21 isolates collected subsequently were USA300 (p = 0.053). Conclusion The incidence of MRSA (colonization and infection) nearly doubled during the study period coinciding with emergence of community-acquired MRSA USA300.

AB - Objective To determine epidemiology and clinical characteristics of infants with methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a level III neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Study Design All NICU admissions (2001 to 2008) with any positive S. aureus culture were included as cases. Cases were further characterized as either colonized or infected with invasive disease. Results Four thousand three hundred four infants were admitted; 273 (6.3%) had at least one culture positive for S. aureus, including 198 with MSSA and 75 with MRSA. Invasive disease occurred in 23.2% of MSSA cases versus 29.3% MRSA (p = 0.298). Between the study periods 2001 to 2005 versus 2006 to 2008, the incidence of all MSSA cultures (colonization and invasive disease) decreased from 53.6 to 38.9/1000 admissions (p = 0.044), and that of MRSA increased from 13.7 to 24.77/1000 admissions (p = 0.010). The incidence of invasive MSSA (p = 0.49) and MRSA (p = 0.38) disease between the two periods remained similar. Infants with invasive MRSA versus MSSA had a longer duration of positive cultures (55 versus 19 days, p = 0.009). None of five available isolates collected prior to 2006 was characterized as USA300, but 11/21 isolates collected subsequently were USA300 (p = 0.053). Conclusion The incidence of MRSA (colonization and infection) nearly doubled during the study period coinciding with emergence of community-acquired MRSA USA300.

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