Staying on the job

The relationship between work performance and cognition in individuals diagnosed with multiple sclerosis

Brandon Baughman, Michael R. Basso, Robert R. Sinclair, Dennis R. Combs, Brad L. Roper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) are apt to become unemployed as the disease progresses, and most research implies that this is due to diminishing mobility. Some studies have shown that presence of cognitive impairment also predicts employment status. Yet, no studies have examined how neuropsychological factors predict vocational performance among individuals with MS who remain employed. We assessed employer- and self-rated work performance, mobility status, and neuropsychological function in a sample of 44 individuals diagnosed with MS. Results suggest that cognitive impairment is common in these employed individuals, despite largely intact mobility status. Moreover, a significant interaction emerged, such that cognitively impaired individuals work performance was rated more poorly by supervisors. In contrast, self-ratings of work performance were higher in cognitively impaired than in unimpaired participants. These novel findings suggest that cognitive impairment may influence work performance, even in patients whose physical disability status is relatively intact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)630-640
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2015

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Cognition
Multiple Sclerosis
Work Performance
Research
Cognitive Dysfunction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Staying on the job : The relationship between work performance and cognition in individuals diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. / Baughman, Brandon; Basso, Michael R.; Sinclair, Robert R.; Combs, Dennis R.; Roper, Brad L.

In: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, Vol. 37, No. 6, 03.07.2015, p. 630-640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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