Stem pain after cementless revision total knee arthroplasty

William Mihalko, Leo A. Whiteside

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) often requires long diaphyseal supporting stems. Pain at the end of the cemented revision stem has been reported, but no study has been published regarding the incidence in cementless revision TKA. This study reviewed 120 cementless revision TKAs with a diaphyseal slotted stem to compare the incidence of stem pain to that in a control cohort of 100 primary TKA patients with a metaphyseal stem. In the revision cohort, 20 out of 120 patients reported pain at the end of their stem on the tibia, but no patient reported thigh pain. In the primary TKA cohort, seven out of 100 patients reported pain below the tibial stem. No correlation between stem length or stem fit was found. This study found that more than 16% of patients may have pain at the end of their press-fit revision TKA stem, and this complication should be explained to patients before their revision TKA surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-139
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of surgical orthopaedic advances
Volume24
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Pain
Incidence
Thigh
Tibia

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Stem pain after cementless revision total knee arthroplasty. / Mihalko, William; Whiteside, Leo A.

In: Journal of surgical orthopaedic advances, Vol. 24, No. 2, 01.06.2015, p. 137-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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