Stereotactic image guidance of cervical spine lateral mass fixation

Kevin Foley, Y. R. Rampersaud

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Screw and plate fixation to the cervical lateral mass (articular process) has become a widely accepted method of posterior instrumentation among spine surgeons. As with any spinal instrumentation procedure, there is significant potential for iatrogenic injury to adjacent neural, vascular, and articular structures. Conventional practice dictates the use of prescribed anatomic guidelines (trajectories) for safe screw placement into the lateral mass. Unfortunately, the anatomy of the Cervical lateral mass is variable from level to level and patient to patient. This natural variability often leads to less than ideal screw entry points that may preclude safe screw placement when using most plating systems. Furthermore, the surgeon has to infer the location of these 'hidden,' critical structures based on exposed dorsal surface anatomy. The use of stereotactic image guidance for the placement of cervical lateral mass screws offers several advantages over conventional practices. Image guidance technology provides the surgeon with unparalleled intraoperative anatomic information. The availability of real- time, three-dimensional images significantly enhances the surgeon's ability to reliably obtain safe lateral mass screw placement. In addition to improved accuracy, image guidance facilitates the individualization (trajectory and length) of each screw to the patient's anatomy, regardless of the screw entry point.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)95-100
Number of pages6
JournalTechniques in Neurosurgery
Volume5
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Spine
Anatomy
Joints
Three-Dimensional Imaging
Blood Vessels
Guidelines
Technology
Surgeons
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Stereotactic image guidance of cervical spine lateral mass fixation. / Foley, Kevin; Rampersaud, Y. R.

In: Techniques in Neurosurgery, Vol. 5, No. 2, 01.01.1999, p. 95-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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