Strategies for the management of early-stage breast cancer in older women

Lee Schwartzberg, Sarah L. Blair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Older patients with breast cancer (aged ≥65 years) are often undertreated with both locoregional and systemic therapies and have been shown to have higher breast cancer-specific mortality. These patients are also excluded from most clinical trials; therefore, treatment recommendations are extrapolated from younger populations. The data that do exist, however, show that older patients usually tolerate and respond well to conventional treatments. When selecting treatments for breast cancer, age should not be the chief consideration; comorbidities and functional status are also important, as is life expectancy. For patients with an estimated survival of less than 5 years, aggressive treatment may be discouraged; however, if the estimated survival is 5 years or more, treatment according to recurrence risk is recommended. In the curative setting, undertreatment should be avoided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-650
Number of pages4
JournalJNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network
Volume14
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

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Breast Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Survival
Life Expectancy
Comorbidity
Clinical Trials
Recurrence
Mortality
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

Strategies for the management of early-stage breast cancer in older women. / Schwartzberg, Lee; Blair, Sarah L.

In: JNCCN Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Vol. 14, 01.05.2016, p. 647-650.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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