Stress and pathogenesis of infectious disease

P. K. Peterson, C. C. Chao, T. Molitor, M. Murtaugh, F. Strgar, Burt Sharp

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

82 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite inherent difficulties in defining and measuring stress, a scientific framework has been provided in recent years for understanding how disruptive life experiences might be translated into altered susceptibility to infectious diseases. Studies of the effects of stress on pathogenesis of infectious disease are highly relevant to assessment of the biological importance of the immune impairments that have been associated with stress. With a few notable exceptions, investigations of viral infections in humans and in animal models support the hypothesis that stress promotes the pathogenesis of such infections. Similar conclusions can be drawn from studies of bacterial infections in humans and animals and from a small number of studies of parasitic infections in rodent models. While many of these studies have substantial limitations, the data nonetheless suggest that stress is a potential cofactor in the pathogenesis of infectious disease. Given recent unprecedented advances in the neurosciences, in immunology, and in the field of microbial pathogenesis, the relationship between stress and infection should be a fruitful topic for interdisciplinary research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)710-720
Number of pages11
JournalReviews of infectious diseases
Volume13
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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Communicable Diseases
Parasitic Diseases
Life Change Events
Virus Diseases
Neurosciences
Infection
Allergy and Immunology
Bacterial Infections
Rodentia
Animal Models
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

Peterson, P. K., Chao, C. C., Molitor, T., Murtaugh, M., Strgar, F., & Sharp, B. (1991). Stress and pathogenesis of infectious disease. Reviews of infectious diseases, 13(4), 710-720.

Stress and pathogenesis of infectious disease. / Peterson, P. K.; Chao, C. C.; Molitor, T.; Murtaugh, M.; Strgar, F.; Sharp, Burt.

In: Reviews of infectious diseases, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.01.1991, p. 710-720.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Peterson, PK, Chao, CC, Molitor, T, Murtaugh, M, Strgar, F & Sharp, B 1991, 'Stress and pathogenesis of infectious disease', Reviews of infectious diseases, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 710-720.
Peterson PK, Chao CC, Molitor T, Murtaugh M, Strgar F, Sharp B. Stress and pathogenesis of infectious disease. Reviews of infectious diseases. 1991 Jan 1;13(4):710-720.
Peterson, P. K. ; Chao, C. C. ; Molitor, T. ; Murtaugh, M. ; Strgar, F. ; Sharp, Burt. / Stress and pathogenesis of infectious disease. In: Reviews of infectious diseases. 1991 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 710-720.
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