Stress Management-Augmented Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention for African American Women: A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Trial

Tiffany L. Cox, Rebecca Krukowski, Sha Rhonda J. Love, Kenya Eddings, Marisha DiCarlo, Jason Y. Chang, T. Elaine Prewitt, Delia Smith West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The relationship between chronic stress and weight management efforts may be a concern for African American (AA) women, who have a high prevalence of obesity, high stress levels, and modest response to obesity treatment. This pilot study randomly assigned 44 overweight/obese AA women with moderate to high stress levels to either a 12-week adaptation of the Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle Balance intervention augmented with stress management strategies (Lifestyle + Stress) or Lifestyle Alone. A trend toward greater percentage of baseline weight loss at 3-month data collection was observed in Lifestyle + Stress (-2.7 ± 3.6%) compared with Lifestyle Alone (-1.4 ± 2.3%; p = .17) and a greater reduction in salivary cortisol (Lifestyle + Stress: -0.2461 ± 0.3985 ng/mL; Lifestyle Alone: -0.0002 ± 0.6275 ng/mL; p = .20). These promising results suggest that augmenting a behavioral weight control intervention with stress management components may be beneficial for overweight/obese AA women with moderate to high stress levels and merit further investigation with an adequately powered trial.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)78-87
Number of pages10
JournalHealth Education and Behavior
Volume40
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2013

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African Americans
Life Style
Weight Loss
Randomized Controlled Trials
Obesity
Weights and Measures
African American Women
Randomized Controlled Trial
Hydrocortisone
Lifestyle

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Stress Management-Augmented Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention for African American Women : A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Trial. / Cox, Tiffany L.; Krukowski, Rebecca; Love, Sha Rhonda J.; Eddings, Kenya; DiCarlo, Marisha; Chang, Jason Y.; Prewitt, T. Elaine; West, Delia Smith.

In: Health Education and Behavior, Vol. 40, No. 1, 01.02.2013, p. 78-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cox, Tiffany L. ; Krukowski, Rebecca ; Love, Sha Rhonda J. ; Eddings, Kenya ; DiCarlo, Marisha ; Chang, Jason Y. ; Prewitt, T. Elaine ; West, Delia Smith. / Stress Management-Augmented Behavioral Weight Loss Intervention for African American Women : A Pilot, Randomized Controlled Trial. In: Health Education and Behavior. 2013 ; Vol. 40, No. 1. pp. 78-87.
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