Stress, Race, and Body Weight

Karen Hye cheon Kim, Zoran Bursac, Vicki DiLillo, Della Brown White, Delia Smith West

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Stress has been identified as a significant factor in health and in racial/ethnic health disparities. A potential mediator in these relationships is body weight. Design: Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between stress, race, and body weight were examined in an ethnically diverse sample of overweight and obese women with Type 2 diabetes (n = 217) enrolled in a behavioral weight loss program. Main Outcome Measures: Stress (Perceived Stress Scale) was assessed at baseline only and body weight (body mass index) was assessed at baseline and 6 months. Results: Stress was not related to baseline body weight. With every 1 unit lower scored on the baseline stress measure, women lost 0.10 kg ± .04 more at 6 months (p < .05). When women were divided into tertiles based on baseline stress scores, those in the lowest stress group had significantly greater weight loss (5.2 kg ± 4.9) compared with those in the highest stress group (3.0 kg ± 4.0) (p < .05). There was a trend for African Americans to report higher levels of stress (20.7 ± 8.8) than Whites (18.3 ± 8.3) (p = .08). Conclusion: The association between higher stress and diminished weight loss has implications for enhancing weight loss programs for women with Type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)131-135
Number of pages5
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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Body Weight
Weight Reduction Programs
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Weight Loss
Health
African Americans
Body Mass Index
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kim, K. H. C., Bursac, Z., DiLillo, V., White, D. B., & West, D. S. (2009). Stress, Race, and Body Weight. Health Psychology, 28(1), 131-135. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0012648

Stress, Race, and Body Weight. / Kim, Karen Hye cheon; Bursac, Zoran; DiLillo, Vicki; White, Della Brown; West, Delia Smith.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 131-135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, KHC, Bursac, Z, DiLillo, V, White, DB & West, DS 2009, 'Stress, Race, and Body Weight', Health Psychology, vol. 28, no. 1, pp. 131-135. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0012648
Kim KHC, Bursac Z, DiLillo V, White DB, West DS. Stress, Race, and Body Weight. Health Psychology. 2009 Jan 1;28(1):131-135. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0012648
Kim, Karen Hye cheon ; Bursac, Zoran ; DiLillo, Vicki ; White, Della Brown ; West, Delia Smith. / Stress, Race, and Body Weight. In: Health Psychology. 2009 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. 131-135.
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