Stroke risk factors and outcomes among various asian ethnic groups in Singapore

Vijay K. Sharma, Georgios Tsivgoulis, Hock Luen Teoh, Benjamin K.C. Ong, Bernard P.L. Chan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Data on interethnic differences in the Asian stroke population are limited. We evaluated the relationships among various cardiovascular risk factors, stroke subtypes, and outcomes in a multiethnic Singaporean population comprising consecutive ischemic stroke patients presenting to our tertiary center over a 1-year period. Strokes were classified based on criteria used in the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST). Functional independence at hospital discharge was defined as a modified Rankin Scale (mRS) score of 0-2. The ethnic distribution of the study population (n = 481; mean age, 64.1 ± 11.9 years) was 74% Chinese, 17% Malay, and 9% Indian. The prevalence of risk factors was similar in the 3 ethnic groups except for diabetes (Chinese, 39.8%; Malay, 67.5%; Indian, 52.3%; P <.001). Hypertension and hypercholesterolemia were the most common cardiovascular risk factors. Lacunar stroke was the most frequent stroke subtype (47.9%). Large-artery atherosclerotic infarctions were more prevalent in Indians (25.0%), whereas lacunar infarctions occured more frequently in Chinese (51.8%; P <.01). No differences in in-hospital mortality and functional independence at discharge were seen among the 3 ethnic groups. Despite the differences in risk factors and in stroke subtypes classified by location or underlying etiology, short-term outcome measures were similar in the 3 different Asian ethnicities in Singapore.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)299-304
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2012

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Singapore
Ethnic Groups
Stroke
Lacunar Stroke
Hospital Mortality
Hypercholesterolemia
Infarction
Population
Arteries
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Hypertension

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Stroke risk factors and outcomes among various asian ethnic groups in Singapore. / Sharma, Vijay K.; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Teoh, Hock Luen; Ong, Benjamin K.C.; Chan, Bernard P.L.

In: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases, Vol. 21, No. 4, 01.05.2012, p. 299-304.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharma, Vijay K. ; Tsivgoulis, Georgios ; Teoh, Hock Luen ; Ong, Benjamin K.C. ; Chan, Bernard P.L. / Stroke risk factors and outcomes among various asian ethnic groups in Singapore. In: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases. 2012 ; Vol. 21, No. 4. pp. 299-304.
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