Structural manipulation of microcone arrays for microsurgical modification of ophthalmic tissues

B. J. Wing, D. A. Schaeffer, T. R. Hendricks, D. Bennett, Edward Chaum, J. T. Simpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to utilize controllable fiber-drawing techniques in order to fabricate glass microcone arrays for use in office-based optical surgery instruments. The cone spacing is controlled via the drawing process while an etching process controls the cone height-to-base ratio. The device viability was tested by imprinting, and subsequent staining, of low-density polyethylene and porcine corneas, resulting in a consistent patterned structure of micronsized perforations. After imprint, the device was examined and no evidence of microcone fracture or overpenetration was present during the course of these experiments. This research promises to lead to advances in optical surgery for the treatment of recurrent corneal erosions, providing quicker, safer, and more cost-effective procedures with decreased risk of vision loss and scarring associated with current procedures such as anterior stromal puncture. The ease of procedure and micron-sized incisions could potentially replace current techniques and provide a viable treatment alternative for recurrent corneal erosions in the visual axis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number034558
JournalJournal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Surgery
Cones
Erosion
Tissue
Low density polyethylenes
Process control
Etching
Equipment and Supplies
Base Composition
Polyethylene
Punctures
Glass
Cornea
Cicatrix
Fibers
Swine
Staining and Labeling
Costs
Costs and Cost Analysis
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Structural manipulation of microcone arrays for microsurgical modification of ophthalmic tissues. / Wing, B. J.; Schaeffer, D. A.; Hendricks, T. R.; Bennett, D.; Chaum, Edward; Simpson, J. T.

In: Journal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME, Vol. 8, No. 3, 034558, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wing, B. J. ; Schaeffer, D. A. ; Hendricks, T. R. ; Bennett, D. ; Chaum, Edward ; Simpson, J. T. / Structural manipulation of microcone arrays for microsurgical modification of ophthalmic tissues. In: Journal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME. 2014 ; Vol. 8, No. 3.
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