Student engagement in professional political advocacy in colleges/schools of pharmacy

Kimberly H. Deloatch, Peter M. Gannett, Tracy Hagemann, Anandi V. Law, Candace Smith, David Trang, John R. Reynolds

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the extent to which a sample of United States colleges/schools of pharmacy engage in developing student professional political advocacy (SPPA) and identify core concepts, essential skills, and related barriers. Methods: A data collection tool was developed and used in a pilot study composed of interviews of key individuals (provost, pharmacy college/school Dean, faculty, and student leader) at six institutions. Qualitative data analysis was conducted by transcript review and coding. Results: Most Deans interviewed stated their college/school had a goal "to prepare students for professional political advocacy" though respondent-rated SPPA as low to medium priority among all college/school priorities. SPPA goals were implicit under leadership or citizenship statements rather than explicitly stated. Respondents' opinions varied regarding the existence and value of such goals, how they are addressed, and whether incentives are provided. Necessary concepts and skills commonly identified included: distinguishing advocacy from issue education; understanding political processes, communication, interpersonal, and leadership skills; and formulating concise, targeted messages. Commonly identified barriers included time constraints; academic schedule conflicts; institutional limitations; lack of faculty and student awareness, interest, confidence, or commitment; travel logistics; and costs. Conclusions: This limited pilot study indicated that various members of the selected colleges/schools of pharmacy value developing students' advocacy skills, perceive common educational development goals and barriers, and have considered mechanisms for enhancing SPPA in their programs. This study provides a foundation for further study and development in the area.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-211
Number of pages5
JournalCurrents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2012

Fingerprint

Pharmacy Schools
Students
Logistics
Motivation
Appointments and Schedules
Education
Communication
Interviews
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacy
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Student engagement in professional political advocacy in colleges/schools of pharmacy. / Deloatch, Kimberly H.; Gannett, Peter M.; Hagemann, Tracy; Law, Anandi V.; Smith, Candace; Trang, David; Reynolds, John R.

In: Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.07.2012, p. 207-211.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Deloatch, Kimberly H. ; Gannett, Peter M. ; Hagemann, Tracy ; Law, Anandi V. ; Smith, Candace ; Trang, David ; Reynolds, John R. / Student engagement in professional political advocacy in colleges/schools of pharmacy. In: Currents in Pharmacy Teaching and Learning. 2012 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 207-211.
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