Studying mechanosensitive ion channels using liposomes.

Boris Martinac, Paul R. Rohde, Andrew R. Battle, Evgeny Petrov, Prithwish Pal, Alexander Fook Foo, Valeria Vasquez, Thuan Huynh, Anna Kloda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels are the primary molecular transducers of mechanical force into electrical and/or chemical intracellular signals in living cells. They have been implicated in innumerable mechanosensory physiological processes including touch and pain sensation, hearing, blood pressure control, micturition, cell volume regulation, tissue growth, or cellular turgor control. Much of what we know about the basic physical principles underlying the conversion of mechanical force acting upon membranes of living cells into conformational changes of MS channels comes from studies of MS channels reconstituted into artificial liposomes. Using bacterial MS channels as a model, we have shown by reconstituting these channels into liposomes that there is a close relationship between the physico-chemical properties of the lipid bilayer and structural dynamics bringing about the function of these channels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-53
Number of pages23
JournalMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
Volume606
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Ion Channels
Liposomes
Physiological Phenomena
Urination
Touch
Lipid Bilayers
Transducers
Cell Size
Hearing
Cell Membrane
Blood Pressure
Pain
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Martinac, B., Rohde, P. R., Battle, A. R., Petrov, E., Pal, P., Foo, A. F., ... Kloda, A. (2010). Studying mechanosensitive ion channels using liposomes. Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), 606, 31-53.

Studying mechanosensitive ion channels using liposomes. / Martinac, Boris; Rohde, Paul R.; Battle, Andrew R.; Petrov, Evgeny; Pal, Prithwish; Foo, Alexander Fook; Vasquez, Valeria; Huynh, Thuan; Kloda, Anna.

In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), Vol. 606, 01.01.2010, p. 31-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martinac, B, Rohde, PR, Battle, AR, Petrov, E, Pal, P, Foo, AF, Vasquez, V, Huynh, T & Kloda, A 2010, 'Studying mechanosensitive ion channels using liposomes.', Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.), vol. 606, pp. 31-53.
Martinac B, Rohde PR, Battle AR, Petrov E, Pal P, Foo AF et al. Studying mechanosensitive ion channels using liposomes. Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.). 2010 Jan 1;606:31-53.
Martinac, Boris ; Rohde, Paul R. ; Battle, Andrew R. ; Petrov, Evgeny ; Pal, Prithwish ; Foo, Alexander Fook ; Vasquez, Valeria ; Huynh, Thuan ; Kloda, Anna. / Studying mechanosensitive ion channels using liposomes. In: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.). 2010 ; Vol. 606. pp. 31-53.
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