Subjective burden in young and older African-American caregivers of patients with end stage renal disease awaiting transplant.

T. T. Harris, C. M. Thomas, Mona Wicks, M. S. Faulkner, Donna Hathaway

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10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purposes of this study were to identify the level of subjective burden reported by African American caregivers of patients diagnosed with end stage renal disease (ESRD) awaiting transplantation and identify whether subjective burden, personal strain, and role strain varied by caregiver age. An exploratory descriptive survey design was used. The convenience sample consisted of 78 African American family caregivers. Subjects were obtained from a University transplant clinic in the Mid-South. Caregivers completed the 22-item self-administered Burden Interview (BI) and a demographic data form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the appropriate parametric and nonparametric tests of group differences. Most caregivers, reported little to none or mild to moderate burden. Results also indicated that there was no significant difference in the level of overall burden, personal strain, and role strain reported by young and older caregivers. Additional findings revealed that burden was least in the caregivers of patients who independently performed activities of daily living (ADL) and greatest among the caregivers of patients assisted by someone other than the caregiver with ADL. Findings from this study may help nurses to assist caregivers to identify their level of burden early in the caregiving process. Implementation of early interventions may prevent negative psychological and physical outcomes in these caregivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNephrology nursing journal : journal of the American Nephrology Nurses' Association
Volume27
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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African Americans
Caregivers
Chronic Kidney Failure
Transplants
Activities of Daily Living
Transplantation
Nurses
Demography
Interviews
Psychology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Subjective burden in young and older African-American caregivers of patients with end stage renal disease awaiting transplant.",
abstract = "The purposes of this study were to identify the level of subjective burden reported by African American caregivers of patients diagnosed with end stage renal disease (ESRD) awaiting transplantation and identify whether subjective burden, personal strain, and role strain varied by caregiver age. An exploratory descriptive survey design was used. The convenience sample consisted of 78 African American family caregivers. Subjects were obtained from a University transplant clinic in the Mid-South. Caregivers completed the 22-item self-administered Burden Interview (BI) and a demographic data form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the appropriate parametric and nonparametric tests of group differences. Most caregivers, reported little to none or mild to moderate burden. Results also indicated that there was no significant difference in the level of overall burden, personal strain, and role strain reported by young and older caregivers. Additional findings revealed that burden was least in the caregivers of patients who independently performed activities of daily living (ADL) and greatest among the caregivers of patients assisted by someone other than the caregiver with ADL. Findings from this study may help nurses to assist caregivers to identify their level of burden early in the caregiving process. Implementation of early interventions may prevent negative psychological and physical outcomes in these caregivers.",
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AU - Harris, T. T.

AU - Thomas, C. M.

AU - Wicks, Mona

AU - Faulkner, M. S.

AU - Hathaway, Donna

PY - 2000/1/1

Y1 - 2000/1/1

N2 - The purposes of this study were to identify the level of subjective burden reported by African American caregivers of patients diagnosed with end stage renal disease (ESRD) awaiting transplantation and identify whether subjective burden, personal strain, and role strain varied by caregiver age. An exploratory descriptive survey design was used. The convenience sample consisted of 78 African American family caregivers. Subjects were obtained from a University transplant clinic in the Mid-South. Caregivers completed the 22-item self-administered Burden Interview (BI) and a demographic data form. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the appropriate parametric and nonparametric tests of group differences. Most caregivers, reported little to none or mild to moderate burden. Results also indicated that there was no significant difference in the level of overall burden, personal strain, and role strain reported by young and older caregivers. Additional findings revealed that burden was least in the caregivers of patients who independently performed activities of daily living (ADL) and greatest among the caregivers of patients assisted by someone other than the caregiver with ADL. Findings from this study may help nurses to assist caregivers to identify their level of burden early in the caregiving process. Implementation of early interventions may prevent negative psychological and physical outcomes in these caregivers.

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