Success in basic combat training

The role of cigarette smoking

Gregory Blake, John A. Parker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied whether cigarette smoking affected a soldier’s ability to complete basic combat training. Demographic and tobacco use information was collected from a cohort of soldiers before they began training. A list of all graduates was obtained and analyzed against the initial questionnaire data. In this prospective study, the smoking group comprised 339 soldiers and the nonsmoking group comprised 535 soldiers. We found that those soldiers who smoked one or more packs of cigarettes per day were at a greater risk for failing basic combat training (relative risk = 2.05, P = 0.092. There was no relationship observed between a soldier’s education and his ability to complete basic combat training. Our data indicate that smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day may adversely affect a soldier’s ability to complete basic combat training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)688-690
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Occupational Medicine
Volume33
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Military Personnel
Smoking
Aptitude
Tobacco Products
Tobacco Use
Demography
Prospective Studies
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Success in basic combat training : The role of cigarette smoking. / Blake, Gregory; Parker, John A.

In: Journal of Occupational Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 6, 01.01.1991, p. 688-690.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{b1ecc5807f734d91897fd716f5f0c7b0,
title = "Success in basic combat training: The role of cigarette smoking",
abstract = "We studied whether cigarette smoking affected a soldier’s ability to complete basic combat training. Demographic and tobacco use information was collected from a cohort of soldiers before they began training. A list of all graduates was obtained and analyzed against the initial questionnaire data. In this prospective study, the smoking group comprised 339 soldiers and the nonsmoking group comprised 535 soldiers. We found that those soldiers who smoked one or more packs of cigarettes per day were at a greater risk for failing basic combat training (relative risk = 2.05, P = 0.092. There was no relationship observed between a soldier’s education and his ability to complete basic combat training. Our data indicate that smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day may adversely affect a soldier’s ability to complete basic combat training.",
author = "Gregory Blake and Parker, {John A.}",
year = "1991",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "33",
pages = "688--690",
journal = "Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "1076-2752",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Success in basic combat training

T2 - The role of cigarette smoking

AU - Blake, Gregory

AU - Parker, John A.

PY - 1991/1/1

Y1 - 1991/1/1

N2 - We studied whether cigarette smoking affected a soldier’s ability to complete basic combat training. Demographic and tobacco use information was collected from a cohort of soldiers before they began training. A list of all graduates was obtained and analyzed against the initial questionnaire data. In this prospective study, the smoking group comprised 339 soldiers and the nonsmoking group comprised 535 soldiers. We found that those soldiers who smoked one or more packs of cigarettes per day were at a greater risk for failing basic combat training (relative risk = 2.05, P = 0.092. There was no relationship observed between a soldier’s education and his ability to complete basic combat training. Our data indicate that smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day may adversely affect a soldier’s ability to complete basic combat training.

AB - We studied whether cigarette smoking affected a soldier’s ability to complete basic combat training. Demographic and tobacco use information was collected from a cohort of soldiers before they began training. A list of all graduates was obtained and analyzed against the initial questionnaire data. In this prospective study, the smoking group comprised 339 soldiers and the nonsmoking group comprised 535 soldiers. We found that those soldiers who smoked one or more packs of cigarettes per day were at a greater risk for failing basic combat training (relative risk = 2.05, P = 0.092. There was no relationship observed between a soldier’s education and his ability to complete basic combat training. Our data indicate that smoking one or more packs of cigarettes per day may adversely affect a soldier’s ability to complete basic combat training.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025879695&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025879695&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 688

EP - 690

JO - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1076-2752

IS - 6

ER -