SU‐E‐T‐159

Sensitivity of in Line Real Time Scintillating Fiber Detectors for External Beam Treatment Verification and Patient Safety

Enrique Izaguirre, S. G. Price, S. Smajlovic, S. Yaddanapudi, H. Wooten, S. Mutic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We studied the sensitivity of a novel transmission fiber scintillator array designed and built for in line treatment verification. The purpose of this project is to assess the capability of the fiber detector array technology to detect treatment errors in real time without false positives to enhance patient safety. Methods: We developed a linear scintillator array detector using radiation hard scintillating fibers and high speed parallel signal conditioning and data acquisition to monitor external beam treatment fluence in real time. The detector captures and resolves the time and amplitude of each linac pulse at each MLC segment. The detector has 60 fibers aligned to each MLC leaf and two output channels per fiber. The data is captured by a high speed parallel digitizer to determine the IMRT beam output delivered to a patient in real time. We evaluated the detector peak pulse linearity according to dose rate, MLC positioning, and beam energy. We analyzed the detector sensitivity, signal to noise ratio, and pulse distribution statistics to determine beam output and fluence in real time. Results: We analyzed the response of the detector to 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams. The statistical analysis of the detected linac pulses indicates that a minimum of 20 pulses are required to evaluate MLC positioning and fluence with 3 mm and 3% resolution, respectively. During testing, no false positives were detected. Linearity with respect to output rate, MLC or jaw opening, and fluence is within 2%. Conclusions: Measured sensitivity and signal to noise ratio of a real time linear fiber array detector show that delivered beam fluence can be monitored every 55 msec, with no observed false positives during treatment to provide in vivo real time patient safety and beam monitoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Number of pages1
JournalMedical Physics
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Patient Safety
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Therapeutics
Jaw
Photons
Radiation
Technology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

SU‐E‐T‐159 : Sensitivity of in Line Real Time Scintillating Fiber Detectors for External Beam Treatment Verification and Patient Safety. / Izaguirre, Enrique; Price, S. G.; Smajlovic, S.; Yaddanapudi, S.; Wooten, H.; Mutic, S.

In: Medical Physics, Vol. 39, No. 6, 01.01.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Purpose: We studied the sensitivity of a novel transmission fiber scintillator array designed and built for in line treatment verification. The purpose of this project is to assess the capability of the fiber detector array technology to detect treatment errors in real time without false positives to enhance patient safety. Methods: We developed a linear scintillator array detector using radiation hard scintillating fibers and high speed parallel signal conditioning and data acquisition to monitor external beam treatment fluence in real time. The detector captures and resolves the time and amplitude of each linac pulse at each MLC segment. The detector has 60 fibers aligned to each MLC leaf and two output channels per fiber. The data is captured by a high speed parallel digitizer to determine the IMRT beam output delivered to a patient in real time. We evaluated the detector peak pulse linearity according to dose rate, MLC positioning, and beam energy. We analyzed the detector sensitivity, signal to noise ratio, and pulse distribution statistics to determine beam output and fluence in real time. Results: We analyzed the response of the detector to 6 MV and 10 MV photon beams. The statistical analysis of the detected linac pulses indicates that a minimum of 20 pulses are required to evaluate MLC positioning and fluence with 3 mm and 3{\%} resolution, respectively. During testing, no false positives were detected. Linearity with respect to output rate, MLC or jaw opening, and fluence is within 2{\%}. Conclusions: Measured sensitivity and signal to noise ratio of a real time linear fiber array detector show that delivered beam fluence can be monitored every 55 msec, with no observed false positives during treatment to provide in vivo real time patient safety and beam monitoring.",
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