Suppressed Anger Is Associated With Increased Carotid Arterial Stiffness in Older Adults

David E. Anderson, E. Metter, Hidetaka Hougaku, Samer S. Najjar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Anger and hostility have been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart disease, but the extent to which the large conduit arteries play an intermediate role in this relationship remains to be clarified. The present study investigated associations of anger frequency and expression style with carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and stiffness in healthy adults older than 50 years. Methods: Two hundred participants (95 men) in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging completed the Spielberger Anger Expression Inventory, which assesses anger frequency (trait anger), anger expression (anger-out), and anger suppression (anger-in). The carotid artery IMT was assessed by ultrasonography. Carotid stiffness was determined from the log of systolic over diastolic blood pressure (BP) as a function of carotid distensibility. Results: In univariate correlational analysis, a significant positive association of anger-in with stiffness was observed (P < .01), together with a less significant association of anger-in with carotid artery IMT (P < .05). Neither anger-out nor trait anger was significantly associated with carotid artery IMT or stiffness. Moreover, none of the anger measures was significantly associated with resting BP in this normotensive sample. As expected, carotid artery IMT, stiffness, and systolic BP were all positively associated. In multivariate analysis, anger-in remained a determinant of stiffness independent of BP, and a marginally significant determinant of carotid artery IMT. Conclusions: This is the first known finding that high anger-in is a significant independent determinant of carotid artery stiffness. These results suggest that high anger-in can potentiate the effects of age on stiffening of the central arteries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1129-1134
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of hypertension
Volume19
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Vascular Stiffness
Anger
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Carotid Arteries
Blood Pressure
Arteries
Baltimore
Hostility

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

Suppressed Anger Is Associated With Increased Carotid Arterial Stiffness in Older Adults. / Anderson, David E.; Metter, E.; Hougaku, Hidetaka; Najjar, Samer S.

In: American journal of hypertension, Vol. 19, No. 11, 01.11.2006, p. 1129-1134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anderson, David E. ; Metter, E. ; Hougaku, Hidetaka ; Najjar, Samer S. / Suppressed Anger Is Associated With Increased Carotid Arterial Stiffness in Older Adults. In: American journal of hypertension. 2006 ; Vol. 19, No. 11. pp. 1129-1134.
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