Suprarenal aortic occlusion

S. Scott Tapper, William Edwards, William H. Edwards, Joseph L. Mulherin, Raymond S. Martin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Purpose: This report was designed to elucidate the clinical manifestations of suprarenal aortic occlusion (SRAO) and determine the efficacy of surgical treatment. Methods: A retrospective review of 135 patients with aortic occlusion was undertaken from which the 16 patients (12%) with SRAO were found. Results: Analysis yielded two subsets of patients based on the time-frame over which SRAO developed. Group I (n = 13) had chronic aortic occlusion with proximal propagation of thrombus to involve the suprarenal aorta. They had uncontrolled hypertension and claudication. Surgical treatment included 16 renal reconstructions (nine patients), two nephrectomies, 10 aortobifemoral bypasses, and three extra-anatomic procedures. The operative mortality rate was 23%. In contrast, group II (n = 3) had acute SRAO, manifest by profound lower extremity ischemia and acute renal failure after cardiac dysrhythmias. Two patients were moribund and died shortly after extraanatomic "salvage" procedures. One patient survived aortobifemoral and bilateral renal artery bypass. Conclusion: Chronic SRAO should be suspected in patients with absent femoral pulses and refractory hypertension. Aortic and renal reconstruction offers long-term improvement in hypertension control and relief of claudication. Acute SRAO is a multisystem disorder that is ineffectively managed with extraanatomic "salvage" procedures.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)372-380
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
    Volume18
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

    Fingerprint

    Hypertension
    Kidney
    Renal Artery
    Thigh
    Nephrectomy
    Acute Kidney Injury
    Aorta
    Cardiac Arrhythmias
    Lower Extremity
    Thrombosis
    Ischemia
    Mortality
    Therapeutics

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Surgery
    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

    Cite this

    Tapper, S. S., Edwards, W., Edwards, W. H., Mulherin, J. L., & Martin, R. S. (1993). Suprarenal aortic occlusion. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 18(3), 372-380. https://doi.org/10.1016/0741-5214(93)90254-J

    Suprarenal aortic occlusion. / Tapper, S. Scott; Edwards, William; Edwards, William H.; Mulherin, Joseph L.; Martin, Raymond S.

    In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 18, No. 3, 01.01.1993, p. 372-380.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Tapper, SS, Edwards, W, Edwards, WH, Mulherin, JL & Martin, RS 1993, 'Suprarenal aortic occlusion', Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 372-380. https://doi.org/10.1016/0741-5214(93)90254-J
    Tapper SS, Edwards W, Edwards WH, Mulherin JL, Martin RS. Suprarenal aortic occlusion. Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1993 Jan 1;18(3):372-380. https://doi.org/10.1016/0741-5214(93)90254-J
    Tapper, S. Scott ; Edwards, William ; Edwards, William H. ; Mulherin, Joseph L. ; Martin, Raymond S. / Suprarenal aortic occlusion. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1993 ; Vol. 18, No. 3. pp. 372-380.
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