Surfactant Protein A2 Polymorphisms and Disease Severity in a Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Population

Chadi M. El Saleeby, Rongling Li, Grant W. Somes, Mary K. Dahmer, Michael W. Quasney, John Devincenzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To examine whether genetic variations within the surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2) gene are associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease severity in infected children. Study design: Naturally infected children aged ≤24 months were prospectively enrolled in 3 RSV seasons. SP-A2 genotyping was performed. Independent clinical predictors of disease severity were analyzed. The association of SP-A2 genetic diversity and disease severity was tested by using multivariate logistic regression models and 4 levels of disease gradation as outcome measures. Results: Homozygosity of the 1A0 allele was protective against hospitalization (odds ratio [OR] = 0.15, P = .0010). This remained significant in African American patients (OR = 0.24, P = .042) and Caucasian patients (OR = 0.05, P = .021) after adjustment for other co-variates. Hospitalized children with the 1A2 allele demonstrated significant protection from severe disease with univariate analyses, but only a trend for protection with multivariate analyses. Patients homozygous or heterozygous for an asparagine at amino acid position 9 were twice or more likely to need intensive care unit admission (OR = 2.15, P = .022), require intubation (OR = 3.04, P = .005), and have a hospitalization lasting ≥4 days (OR = 1.89, P = .02) compared with children homozygous for a threonine at this position. Conclusions: SP-A2 polymorphisms are associated with the severity of RSV infection in infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume156
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
varespladib methyl
Surface-Active Agents
Odds Ratio
Population
Proteins
Hospitalization
Logistic Models
Alleles
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Hospitalized Child
Asparagine
Virus Diseases
Threonine
Intubation
African Americans
Intensive Care Units
Multivariate Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Surfactant Protein A2 Polymorphisms and Disease Severity in a Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Population. / El Saleeby, Chadi M.; Li, Rongling; Somes, Grant W.; Dahmer, Mary K.; Quasney, Michael W.; Devincenzo, John.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 156, No. 3, 01.01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

El Saleeby, Chadi M. ; Li, Rongling ; Somes, Grant W. ; Dahmer, Mary K. ; Quasney, Michael W. ; Devincenzo, John. / Surfactant Protein A2 Polymorphisms and Disease Severity in a Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Infected Population. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2010 ; Vol. 156, No. 3.
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abstract = "Objective: To examine whether genetic variations within the surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2) gene are associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) disease severity in infected children. Study design: Naturally infected children aged ≤24 months were prospectively enrolled in 3 RSV seasons. SP-A2 genotyping was performed. Independent clinical predictors of disease severity were analyzed. The association of SP-A2 genetic diversity and disease severity was tested by using multivariate logistic regression models and 4 levels of disease gradation as outcome measures. Results: Homozygosity of the 1A0 allele was protective against hospitalization (odds ratio [OR] = 0.15, P = .0010). This remained significant in African American patients (OR = 0.24, P = .042) and Caucasian patients (OR = 0.05, P = .021) after adjustment for other co-variates. Hospitalized children with the 1A2 allele demonstrated significant protection from severe disease with univariate analyses, but only a trend for protection with multivariate analyses. Patients homozygous or heterozygous for an asparagine at amino acid position 9 were twice or more likely to need intensive care unit admission (OR = 2.15, P = .022), require intubation (OR = 3.04, P = .005), and have a hospitalization lasting ≥4 days (OR = 1.89, P = .02) compared with children homozygous for a threonine at this position. Conclusions: SP-A2 polymorphisms are associated with the severity of RSV infection in infants.",
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