Surgical informed consent in children

a systematic review

Pranit N. Chotai, Richard Nollan, Eunice Huang, Ankush Gosain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The purpose of the article was to analyze current literature on surgeon and parents’ understanding and role in the informed consent process for children undergoing surgery. Methods A systematic database search (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and EBM Reviews) was performed to identify articles concerning any aspect of the surgical informed consent for children undergoing an invasive procedure. Articles analyzing informed consent in research studies, non–English-language articles, review articles, case reports and/or series, letters–commentaries, and dentistry and/or nursing-related articles were excluded. Articles meeting inclusion criteria were analyzed to identify common themes related to the process of informed consent. Results One hundred seventy-eight articles were identified on primary search, after removing duplicates and screening titles for relevance, 83 abstracts were reviewed. Thirty-two additional abstracts were identified by secondary search. Twelve of 115 articles met inclusion criteria. Analysis identified five different study themes. Information delivered during consent (Content) was studied in five articles (42%), three (25%) studied the mechanics or delivery of the information (Delivery), three (25%) studied parent participation and discussion (Interchange), six articles (50%) discussed surgeons#x0027; perceptions or the parents’ ability to understand or recall the information (Comprehension), and five articles (42%) evaluated surgeon or parent satisfaction or anxiety (Satisfaction). None of the articles studied all five categories. Conclusions Studies of the surgical informed consent process in children are scarce. Prospective studies evaluating surgeon and parent perception regarding the Content, Delivery, and Interchange of information as well as Comprehension and Satisfaction are needed to understand barriers to the surgeon–patient relationship and to optimize the informed consent process in children undergoing surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-198
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume213
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Informed Consent
Parents
Aptitude
Dentistry
Mechanics
MEDLINE
Nursing
Language
Anxiety
Databases
Prospective Studies
Surgeons
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Surgical informed consent in children : a systematic review. / Chotai, Pranit N.; Nollan, Richard; Huang, Eunice; Gosain, Ankush.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 213, 01.06.2017, p. 191-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Background The purpose of the article was to analyze current literature on surgeon and parents’ understanding and role in the informed consent process for children undergoing surgery. Methods A systematic database search (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and EBM Reviews) was performed to identify articles concerning any aspect of the surgical informed consent for children undergoing an invasive procedure. Articles analyzing informed consent in research studies, non–English-language articles, review articles, case reports and/or series, letters–commentaries, and dentistry and/or nursing-related articles were excluded. Articles meeting inclusion criteria were analyzed to identify common themes related to the process of informed consent. Results One hundred seventy-eight articles were identified on primary search, after removing duplicates and screening titles for relevance, 83 abstracts were reviewed. Thirty-two additional abstracts were identified by secondary search. Twelve of 115 articles met inclusion criteria. Analysis identified five different study themes. Information delivered during consent (Content) was studied in five articles (42{\%}), three (25{\%}) studied the mechanics or delivery of the information (Delivery), three (25{\%}) studied parent participation and discussion (Interchange), six articles (50{\%}) discussed surgeons#x0027; perceptions or the parents’ ability to understand or recall the information (Comprehension), and five articles (42{\%}) evaluated surgeon or parent satisfaction or anxiety (Satisfaction). None of the articles studied all five categories. Conclusions Studies of the surgical informed consent process in children are scarce. Prospective studies evaluating surgeon and parent perception regarding the Content, Delivery, and Interchange of information as well as Comprehension and Satisfaction are needed to understand barriers to the surgeon–patient relationship and to optimize the informed consent process in children undergoing surgery.",
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N2 - Background The purpose of the article was to analyze current literature on surgeon and parents’ understanding and role in the informed consent process for children undergoing surgery. Methods A systematic database search (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and EBM Reviews) was performed to identify articles concerning any aspect of the surgical informed consent for children undergoing an invasive procedure. Articles analyzing informed consent in research studies, non–English-language articles, review articles, case reports and/or series, letters–commentaries, and dentistry and/or nursing-related articles were excluded. Articles meeting inclusion criteria were analyzed to identify common themes related to the process of informed consent. Results One hundred seventy-eight articles were identified on primary search, after removing duplicates and screening titles for relevance, 83 abstracts were reviewed. Thirty-two additional abstracts were identified by secondary search. Twelve of 115 articles met inclusion criteria. Analysis identified five different study themes. Information delivered during consent (Content) was studied in five articles (42%), three (25%) studied the mechanics or delivery of the information (Delivery), three (25%) studied parent participation and discussion (Interchange), six articles (50%) discussed surgeons#x0027; perceptions or the parents’ ability to understand or recall the information (Comprehension), and five articles (42%) evaluated surgeon or parent satisfaction or anxiety (Satisfaction). None of the articles studied all five categories. Conclusions Studies of the surgical informed consent process in children are scarce. Prospective studies evaluating surgeon and parent perception regarding the Content, Delivery, and Interchange of information as well as Comprehension and Satisfaction are needed to understand barriers to the surgeon–patient relationship and to optimize the informed consent process in children undergoing surgery.

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