Surgical Landmarks to Locating the Main Trunk of the Facial Nerve in Parotid Surgery: A Systematic Review

Yisi D. Ji, R. Bruce Donoff, Zachary S. Peacock, Eric Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe distances from commonly used anatomic landmarks to the main trunk of the facial nerve during parotid surgery. Materials and Methods A systematic search of the published literature was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. All studies from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2017 that measured distances to the main trunk of the facial nerve from common anatomic landmarks were eligible. Inclusion criteria were English-language articles with distances measured from the main trunk of the facial nerve to anatomic landmarks. The primary outcome variable was the distance from the respective anatomic landmarks. Other variables included surgical approach, year, and existential status of subject (cadaveric or living). Results The search yielded 1,412 studies (1,397 by PubMed, 15 by reference searching), with 10 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Within the 10 studies, there were 30 reported means and 375 dissected cadavers. The most common incision was the standard preauricular incision; the mean distances to the facial trunk from landmarks were 13.6 ± 11.0 mm (n = 6 reported means) for the tragal pointer, 8.79 ± 3.99 mm (n = 7 reported means) for the posterior belly of the digastric muscle, 10.5 ± 1.4 mm (n = 4 reported means) for the tip of the mastoid process, 14.99 ± 1.68 mm (n = 3 means) for the transverse process of C1, 3.79 ± 2.92 mm (n = 6 means) for the tympanomastoid fissure, 9.80 ± 0 mm (n = 1 mean) for the styloid process, and 11.77 ± 1.42 mm (n = 3 means) for the external auditory meatus. Formal assessment of inter-study variability could not be assessed because of the small number of studies and measurements. Conclusion There are substantial variations in measurements from anatomic landmarks to the main trunk of the facial nerve in the literature. Therefore, multiple landmarks can be used to identify the main trunk of the facial nerve during parotid surgery. The distances reported in this study can guide surgeons during parotid surgery to decrease the risk of facial nerve damage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)438-443
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume76
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Anatomic Landmarks
Facial Nerve
Mastoid
Cadaver
PubMed
Meta-Analysis
Language
Guidelines
Muscles

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oral Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Surgical Landmarks to Locating the Main Trunk of the Facial Nerve in Parotid Surgery : A Systematic Review. / Ji, Yisi D.; Donoff, R. Bruce; Peacock, Zachary S.; Carlson, Eric.

In: Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Vol. 76, No. 2, 01.02.2018, p. 438-443.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f3e25971f99d4300801916031e401c4c,
title = "Surgical Landmarks to Locating the Main Trunk of the Facial Nerve in Parotid Surgery: A Systematic Review",
abstract = "Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe distances from commonly used anatomic landmarks to the main trunk of the facial nerve during parotid surgery. Materials and Methods A systematic search of the published literature was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. All studies from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2017 that measured distances to the main trunk of the facial nerve from common anatomic landmarks were eligible. Inclusion criteria were English-language articles with distances measured from the main trunk of the facial nerve to anatomic landmarks. The primary outcome variable was the distance from the respective anatomic landmarks. Other variables included surgical approach, year, and existential status of subject (cadaveric or living). Results The search yielded 1,412 studies (1,397 by PubMed, 15 by reference searching), with 10 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Within the 10 studies, there were 30 reported means and 375 dissected cadavers. The most common incision was the standard preauricular incision; the mean distances to the facial trunk from landmarks were 13.6 ± 11.0 mm (n = 6 reported means) for the tragal pointer, 8.79 ± 3.99 mm (n = 7 reported means) for the posterior belly of the digastric muscle, 10.5 ± 1.4 mm (n = 4 reported means) for the tip of the mastoid process, 14.99 ± 1.68 mm (n = 3 means) for the transverse process of C1, 3.79 ± 2.92 mm (n = 6 means) for the tympanomastoid fissure, 9.80 ± 0 mm (n = 1 mean) for the styloid process, and 11.77 ± 1.42 mm (n = 3 means) for the external auditory meatus. Formal assessment of inter-study variability could not be assessed because of the small number of studies and measurements. Conclusion There are substantial variations in measurements from anatomic landmarks to the main trunk of the facial nerve in the literature. Therefore, multiple landmarks can be used to identify the main trunk of the facial nerve during parotid surgery. The distances reported in this study can guide surgeons during parotid surgery to decrease the risk of facial nerve damage.",
author = "Ji, {Yisi D.} and Donoff, {R. Bruce} and Peacock, {Zachary S.} and Eric Carlson",
year = "2018",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.joms.2017.06.039",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "76",
pages = "438--443",
journal = "Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery",
issn = "0278-2391",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Surgical Landmarks to Locating the Main Trunk of the Facial Nerve in Parotid Surgery

T2 - A Systematic Review

AU - Ji, Yisi D.

AU - Donoff, R. Bruce

AU - Peacock, Zachary S.

AU - Carlson, Eric

PY - 2018/2/1

Y1 - 2018/2/1

N2 - Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe distances from commonly used anatomic landmarks to the main trunk of the facial nerve during parotid surgery. Materials and Methods A systematic search of the published literature was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. All studies from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2017 that measured distances to the main trunk of the facial nerve from common anatomic landmarks were eligible. Inclusion criteria were English-language articles with distances measured from the main trunk of the facial nerve to anatomic landmarks. The primary outcome variable was the distance from the respective anatomic landmarks. Other variables included surgical approach, year, and existential status of subject (cadaveric or living). Results The search yielded 1,412 studies (1,397 by PubMed, 15 by reference searching), with 10 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Within the 10 studies, there were 30 reported means and 375 dissected cadavers. The most common incision was the standard preauricular incision; the mean distances to the facial trunk from landmarks were 13.6 ± 11.0 mm (n = 6 reported means) for the tragal pointer, 8.79 ± 3.99 mm (n = 7 reported means) for the posterior belly of the digastric muscle, 10.5 ± 1.4 mm (n = 4 reported means) for the tip of the mastoid process, 14.99 ± 1.68 mm (n = 3 means) for the transverse process of C1, 3.79 ± 2.92 mm (n = 6 means) for the tympanomastoid fissure, 9.80 ± 0 mm (n = 1 mean) for the styloid process, and 11.77 ± 1.42 mm (n = 3 means) for the external auditory meatus. Formal assessment of inter-study variability could not be assessed because of the small number of studies and measurements. Conclusion There are substantial variations in measurements from anatomic landmarks to the main trunk of the facial nerve in the literature. Therefore, multiple landmarks can be used to identify the main trunk of the facial nerve during parotid surgery. The distances reported in this study can guide surgeons during parotid surgery to decrease the risk of facial nerve damage.

AB - Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe distances from commonly used anatomic landmarks to the main trunk of the facial nerve during parotid surgery. Materials and Methods A systematic search of the published literature was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. All studies from January 1, 1990 to January 1, 2017 that measured distances to the main trunk of the facial nerve from common anatomic landmarks were eligible. Inclusion criteria were English-language articles with distances measured from the main trunk of the facial nerve to anatomic landmarks. The primary outcome variable was the distance from the respective anatomic landmarks. Other variables included surgical approach, year, and existential status of subject (cadaveric or living). Results The search yielded 1,412 studies (1,397 by PubMed, 15 by reference searching), with 10 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Within the 10 studies, there were 30 reported means and 375 dissected cadavers. The most common incision was the standard preauricular incision; the mean distances to the facial trunk from landmarks were 13.6 ± 11.0 mm (n = 6 reported means) for the tragal pointer, 8.79 ± 3.99 mm (n = 7 reported means) for the posterior belly of the digastric muscle, 10.5 ± 1.4 mm (n = 4 reported means) for the tip of the mastoid process, 14.99 ± 1.68 mm (n = 3 means) for the transverse process of C1, 3.79 ± 2.92 mm (n = 6 means) for the tympanomastoid fissure, 9.80 ± 0 mm (n = 1 mean) for the styloid process, and 11.77 ± 1.42 mm (n = 3 means) for the external auditory meatus. Formal assessment of inter-study variability could not be assessed because of the small number of studies and measurements. Conclusion There are substantial variations in measurements from anatomic landmarks to the main trunk of the facial nerve in the literature. Therefore, multiple landmarks can be used to identify the main trunk of the facial nerve during parotid surgery. The distances reported in this study can guide surgeons during parotid surgery to decrease the risk of facial nerve damage.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85027731548&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85027731548&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.joms.2017.06.039

DO - 10.1016/j.joms.2017.06.039

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85027731548

VL - 76

SP - 438

EP - 443

JO - Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

JF - Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

SN - 0278-2391

IS - 2

ER -