Surgical Management of Simultaneous Left Coronary Atresia and Anomalous Right Coronary Artery Origin

Shyam Sathanandam, T. K.Susheel Kumar, Umar Boston, Christopher J. Knott-Craig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A 9-year-old child presented with syncope during exercise. He received a diagnosis of congenital atresia of the left main coronary artery by angiography. He underwent successful coronary artery bypass grafting. On the third postoperative day, he experienced acute, precordial chest pain. An urgent computed tomographic scan showed an unrecognized anomalous origin of the right coronary artery (RCA) with a 1.5-cm intramural course. He was taken back to the operating room to undergo unroofing of the RCA. This case highlights the difficulty involved in making two rare diagnoses that can cause the same exact symptoms in a patient and the surgical challenges associated with it.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e513-e515
JournalAnnals of Thoracic Surgery
Volume103
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Coronary Vessels
Syncope
Operating Rooms
Coronary Angiography
Chest Pain
Coronary Artery Bypass
Exercise

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Surgical Management of Simultaneous Left Coronary Atresia and Anomalous Right Coronary Artery Origin. / Sathanandam, Shyam; Kumar, T. K.Susheel; Boston, Umar; Knott-Craig, Christopher J.

In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 103, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. e513-e515.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sathanandam, Shyam ; Kumar, T. K.Susheel ; Boston, Umar ; Knott-Craig, Christopher J. / Surgical Management of Simultaneous Left Coronary Atresia and Anomalous Right Coronary Artery Origin. In: Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 2017 ; Vol. 103, No. 6. pp. e513-e515.
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