Survival and toxicity of xenogeneic murine retroviral vector producer cells in liver

Donald W. Moorman, Daniel A. Butler, John Stanley, Jesse L. Lamsam, Kenneth W. Culver, Mark R. Ackermann, Carol D. Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Murine retroviral vector producer cells (VPC) can selectively transfer genes stably into proliferating cells. We injected LacZ gene producing VPC directly into normal rat liver. There was no measurable gene transfer into the surrounding hepatic parenchyma with X‐GAL staining. Rejection of the xenogeneic murine VPC occurred 7‐14 days after injection. Toxicity of this delivery method was evaluated with the herpes simplex‐thymidine kinase (HS‐tk) gene, which confers sensitivity to the antiherpes drug, ganciclovir (GCV). HS‐tk VPC were injected and allowed to grow in normal liver for 7 days before GCV treatment. There was no clinical or histologic evidence of toxicity with GCV treatment. These findings suggest that the direct injection of murine VPC into xenogeneic human tumors may survive sufficiently long without immunosuppression to transfer genes to tumor cells in situ without attendant toxicity. © 1994 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)152-156
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Surgical Oncology
Volume57
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Survival
Liver
Ganciclovir
Genes
Phosphotransferases
Injections
Lac Operon
Immunosuppression
Neoplasms
Staining and Labeling
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

Cite this

Moorman, D. W., Butler, D. A., Stanley, J., Lamsam, J. L., Culver, K. W., Ackermann, M. R., & Jacobson, C. D. (1994). Survival and toxicity of xenogeneic murine retroviral vector producer cells in liver. Journal of Surgical Oncology, 57(3), 152-156. https://doi.org/10.1002/jso.2930570304

Survival and toxicity of xenogeneic murine retroviral vector producer cells in liver. / Moorman, Donald W.; Butler, Daniel A.; Stanley, John; Lamsam, Jesse L.; Culver, Kenneth W.; Ackermann, Mark R.; Jacobson, Carol D.

In: Journal of Surgical Oncology, Vol. 57, No. 3, 01.01.1994, p. 152-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moorman, DW, Butler, DA, Stanley, J, Lamsam, JL, Culver, KW, Ackermann, MR & Jacobson, CD 1994, 'Survival and toxicity of xenogeneic murine retroviral vector producer cells in liver', Journal of Surgical Oncology, vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 152-156. https://doi.org/10.1002/jso.2930570304
Moorman, Donald W. ; Butler, Daniel A. ; Stanley, John ; Lamsam, Jesse L. ; Culver, Kenneth W. ; Ackermann, Mark R. ; Jacobson, Carol D. / Survival and toxicity of xenogeneic murine retroviral vector producer cells in liver. In: Journal of Surgical Oncology. 1994 ; Vol. 57, No. 3. pp. 152-156.
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