Survival of the very-low-birth-weight infants after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonatal intensive care unit

Anna S. Kostelanetz, Ramasubbareddy Dhanireddy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess whether in neonatal care in the last decade have altered the outcome of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Study Design: Medical records of all VLBW infants (n = 283, body weight (BW) = 1066 ± 281 g, gestational age (GA) = 28.3 ± 2.9 weeks) admitted to the NICU between 1999 and 2002 were reviewed. Results: In all, 29 (10.25%) infants received CPR in the NICU. Only one of these infants survived. After adjusting for GA, the clinical variables significantly associated with the need for CPR in the NICU were (adjusted odds ratio; 95% CI): pulmonary hemorrhage (7.89; 3.06 to 20.28), pulmonary air leak syndrome (23.90; 7.58 to 75.4), and delivery by Cesarian section (0.26; 0.1 to 0.66). The results were similar when the data were reanalyzed matching the 28 infants in the CPR group with 28 infants of identical GA in the non-CPR group. Conclusions: Survival rate for the infants who require CPR in the NICU remains extremely poor. This poor outcome needs to be discussed with parents and the option of the "do not resuscitate" (DNR) order may be appropriate for these infants, especially for those infants with multiple organ failure unresponsive to therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-283
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2004

Fingerprint

Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Survival
Gestational Age
Resuscitation Orders
Lung
Multiple Organ Failure
Resuscitation
Cesarean Section
Medical Records
Survival Rate
Parents
Odds Ratio
Air
Body Weight
Hemorrhage

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Survival of the very-low-birth-weight infants after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in neonatal intensive care unit. / Kostelanetz, Anna S.; Dhanireddy, Ramasubbareddy.

In: Journal of Perinatology, Vol. 24, No. 5, 01.05.2004, p. 279-283.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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abstract = "Objective: To assess whether in neonatal care in the last decade have altered the outcome of very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Study Design: Medical records of all VLBW infants (n = 283, body weight (BW) = 1066 ± 281 g, gestational age (GA) = 28.3 ± 2.9 weeks) admitted to the NICU between 1999 and 2002 were reviewed. Results: In all, 29 (10.25{\%}) infants received CPR in the NICU. Only one of these infants survived. After adjusting for GA, the clinical variables significantly associated with the need for CPR in the NICU were (adjusted odds ratio; 95{\%} CI): pulmonary hemorrhage (7.89; 3.06 to 20.28), pulmonary air leak syndrome (23.90; 7.58 to 75.4), and delivery by Cesarian section (0.26; 0.1 to 0.66). The results were similar when the data were reanalyzed matching the 28 infants in the CPR group with 28 infants of identical GA in the non-CPR group. Conclusions: Survival rate for the infants who require CPR in the NICU remains extremely poor. This poor outcome needs to be discussed with parents and the option of the {"}do not resuscitate{"} (DNR) order may be appropriate for these infants, especially for those infants with multiple organ failure unresponsive to therapy.",
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