Susceptibility of Escherichia coli to bactericidal action of lactoperoxidase, peroxide, and iodide or thiocyanate

Edwin Thomas, T. M. Aune

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The bactericidal action that results from lactoperoxidase-catalyzed oxidation of iodide or thiocyanate was studied, using E. coli as the test organism. The susceptibility of intact cells to bactericidal action was compared with that of cells with altered cell envelopes. Exposure to ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, to lysozyme and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, or to osmotic shock were used to alter the cell envelope. Bactericidal action was greatly increased when the cells were exposed to the lactoperoxidase- peroxide-iodide system at low temperatures, low cell density, or after alteration of the cell envelope. When thiocyanate was substituted for iodide, bactericidal activity was observed only at low cell density or after osmotic shock. Low temperature and low cell density lowered the rate of destruction of peroxide by the bacteria. Therefore, competition for peroxide between the bacteria and lactoperoxidase may influence the extent of bactericidal action. Alteration of the cell envelope had only a small effect on the rate of destruction of peroxide. Instead, the increased susceptibility of these altered cells suggested that bactericidal action required permeation of a reagent through the cell envelope. In addition to altering the cell envelope, these procedures partly depleted cells of oxidizable substrates and sulfhydryl components. Adding an oxidizable substrate did not decrease the susceptibility of the altered cells. On the other hand, mild reducing agents such as sulfhydryl compounds did partly reverse bactericidal action when added after exposure of cells to the peroxidase systems. These studies indicate that alteration of the metabolism, structure, or composition of bacterial cells can greatly increase their susceptibility to peroxidase bactericidal action.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)261-265
Number of pages5
JournalAntimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1978
Externally publishedYes

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Lactoperoxidase
Peroxides
Iodides
Escherichia coli
Cell Count
Osmotic Pressure
thiocyanate
Edetic Acid
Peroxidase
Bacteria
Temperature
Reducing Agents
Muramidase
Sulfhydryl Compounds

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Susceptibility of Escherichia coli to bactericidal action of lactoperoxidase, peroxide, and iodide or thiocyanate. / Thomas, Edwin; Aune, T. M.

In: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, Vol. 13, No. 2, 01.01.1978, p. 261-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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