Susceptibility of Liver Allografts to High or Low Concentrations of Preformed Antibodies as Measured by Flow Cytometry

Juan C. Scornik, Consuelo Soldevilla-Pico, Willem J. Van Der Werf, Alan W. Hemming, Alan I. Reed, Max Langham, Richard J. Howard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Liver grafts are more resistant to damage by HLA antibodies than other organ allografts, but it is not clear if the antibodies are associated with graft rejection or graft loss, or if different antibody concentrations have different effects. To explore potential associations between antibody concentrations and outcome, preformed IgG antibodies against donor cells were quantified by flow cytometry in 465 consecutive liver transplant recipients. Antibody-positive patients were classified according to whether they had high or low antibody concentrations and analyzed for possible correlation with graft rejection or graft loss. The results showed that the incidence of rejection was not significantly different between antibody-positive and -negative patients. However, patients with high antibody concentrations had a higher incidence of steroid-resistant rejections (31% at 1 year) than patients with low antibody (4%) or no antibody (8%, p <0.0004). These effects were mainly due to T-cell (HLA class I) antibodies. The overall incidence of rejection at 1 year was 69% for high antibody patients, 51% for patients with low antibodies and 53% for patients with no antibodies (p not significant). In an apparent paradox, antibody-positive patients underwent fewer early graft losses. Thus, the associations of preformed antibodies and outcome depend, on the one hand, on antibody concentrations, and on the other hand on whether the outcome measured is steroid-sensitive rejection, steroid-resistant rejection or graft survival. These complex interactions may explain the controversial results observed in previous studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)152-156
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Transplantation
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2001

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Allografts
Flow Cytometry
Antibodies
Liver
Transplants
Steroids
Graft Rejection
Incidence
Immunoglobulin Isotypes
Graft Survival
Immunoglobulin G

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Susceptibility of Liver Allografts to High or Low Concentrations of Preformed Antibodies as Measured by Flow Cytometry. / Scornik, Juan C.; Soldevilla-Pico, Consuelo; Van Der Werf, Willem J.; Hemming, Alan W.; Reed, Alan I.; Langham, Max; Howard, Richard J.

In: American Journal of Transplantation, Vol. 1, No. 2, 01.07.2001, p. 152-156.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scornik, Juan C. ; Soldevilla-Pico, Consuelo ; Van Der Werf, Willem J. ; Hemming, Alan W. ; Reed, Alan I. ; Langham, Max ; Howard, Richard J. / Susceptibility of Liver Allografts to High or Low Concentrations of Preformed Antibodies as Measured by Flow Cytometry. In: American Journal of Transplantation. 2001 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 152-156.
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