Sustained upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in Müller cells in pigeon retina following disruption of the parasympathetic control of choroidal blood flow

Toya D.H. Kimble, Malinda E.C. Fitzgerald, Anton Reiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Choroidal blood flow in pigeon eyes is light driven and controlled by a parasympathetic input from ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons that receive input from the medial subdivision of the ipsilateral nucleus of Edinger-Westphal (EWM). EWM lesions diminish basal ChBF and irreversibly prevent ipsilateral light-evoked increases in ChBF, presumably rendering the retina mildly ischemic. To characterize the location, severity, and time course of the retinal abnormality caused by an EWM lesion, we quantitatively analyzed the cellular and regional extent of Müller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunolabeling up to nearly a year after an EWM lesion. We found that unilateral EWM lesions greatly increased Müller cell GFAP throughout the entire retinal depth and topographic extent of the affected eye, up to nearly a year post lesion. By contrast, destruction of the pupilloconstrictive pretectum or of the pupilloconstrictive part of lateral EW (EWL) did not appreciably increase Müller cell GFAP. Thus, the large increase in Müller cell GFAP following an EW lesion is attributable to an ongoing defect in choroidal vasodilatory function rather than to chronic pupil dilation. The Müller cell GFAP increase was greater ipsilateral than contralateral to the EWM destruction for the retinal territory deep to the heavily CG-innervated superior and temporal choroid, but not for the retinal territory deep to the poorly CG-innervated inferior and nasal choroid. The GFAP increase was light-dependent, since it did not occur in EW-lesioned birds housed in dim illumination. Our results show that the chronic vascular insufficiency caused by the loss of the EWM-mediated parasympathetic control of choroidal blood flow leads to a significant and sustained increase in retinal Müller cell GFAP. This increase could be a sign of a disturbance in retinal homeostasis that eventually leads to retinal injury and impaired visual function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1017-1030
Number of pages14
JournalExperimental Eye Research
Volume83
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2006

Fingerprint

Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein
Columbidae
Retina
Up-Regulation
Parasympathetic Ganglia
Choroid
Light
Pupil
Lighting
Nose
Birds
Blood Vessels
Dilatation
Homeostasis
Neurons
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Cite this

Sustained upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein in Müller cells in pigeon retina following disruption of the parasympathetic control of choroidal blood flow. / Kimble, Toya D.H.; Fitzgerald, Malinda E.C.; Reiner, Anton.

In: Experimental Eye Research, Vol. 83, No. 5, 01.11.2006, p. 1017-1030.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Choroidal blood flow in pigeon eyes is light driven and controlled by a parasympathetic input from ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons that receive input from the medial subdivision of the ipsilateral nucleus of Edinger-Westphal (EWM). EWM lesions diminish basal ChBF and irreversibly prevent ipsilateral light-evoked increases in ChBF, presumably rendering the retina mildly ischemic. To characterize the location, severity, and time course of the retinal abnormality caused by an EWM lesion, we quantitatively analyzed the cellular and regional extent of M{\"u}ller cell glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunolabeling up to nearly a year after an EWM lesion. We found that unilateral EWM lesions greatly increased M{\"u}ller cell GFAP throughout the entire retinal depth and topographic extent of the affected eye, up to nearly a year post lesion. By contrast, destruction of the pupilloconstrictive pretectum or of the pupilloconstrictive part of lateral EW (EWL) did not appreciably increase M{\"u}ller cell GFAP. Thus, the large increase in M{\"u}ller cell GFAP following an EW lesion is attributable to an ongoing defect in choroidal vasodilatory function rather than to chronic pupil dilation. The M{\"u}ller cell GFAP increase was greater ipsilateral than contralateral to the EWM destruction for the retinal territory deep to the heavily CG-innervated superior and temporal choroid, but not for the retinal territory deep to the poorly CG-innervated inferior and nasal choroid. The GFAP increase was light-dependent, since it did not occur in EW-lesioned birds housed in dim illumination. Our results show that the chronic vascular insufficiency caused by the loss of the EWM-mediated parasympathetic control of choroidal blood flow leads to a significant and sustained increase in retinal M{\"u}ller cell GFAP. This increase could be a sign of a disturbance in retinal homeostasis that eventually leads to retinal injury and impaired visual function.",
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