Swallowed endotracheal tube

A neonatal emergency. Case report

John Mack, J. M. Matthews, R. M. Takamoto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A full-term female infant weighing 2,954 gm was delivered by cesarean sections because of placenta previa. Apgar scores were 3 at one minute and 6 at five minutes. The infant was intubated for respiratory support and control of secretions. During intubation, the F10 endotracheal tube was inadvertently passed into the esophagus. As it was being withdrawn by the plastic adapter, the tube separated and was swallowed. Ventilation by mouth resulted in rapid improvement in the infant's respiratory status and reintubation was not necessary. Chest-x-ray showed the endotracheal tube to be lodged in the distal esophagus and stomach. The endotracheal tube could not be seen on the direct laryngoscopy. An F6 Fogarty embolectomy catheter was passed blindly down the esophagus into the stomach where the balloon was inflated. An introducer was not used, and x-ray assistance was not required to check the position of the catheter. The catheter and endotracheal tube were then gently withdrawn into the oropharynx, where the tube was grasped and extracted with a hemostat. The infant had no respiratory problems during or after the procedure. The remainder of the hospital course was uneventful and the infant was discharged in excellent condition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)354-355
Number of pages2
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume146
Issue number5
StatePublished - Dec 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

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Emergencies
Esophagus
Catheters
Stomach
X-Rays
Embolectomy
Placenta Previa
Laryngoscopy
Oropharynx
Apgar Score
Intubation
Cesarean Section
Plastics
Ventilation
Mouth
Thorax

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Mack, J., Matthews, J. M., & Takamoto, R. M. (1981). Swallowed endotracheal tube: A neonatal emergency. Case report. Military Medicine, 146(5), 354-355.

Swallowed endotracheal tube : A neonatal emergency. Case report. / Mack, John; Matthews, J. M.; Takamoto, R. M.

In: Military Medicine, Vol. 146, No. 5, 01.12.1981, p. 354-355.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mack, J, Matthews, JM & Takamoto, RM 1981, 'Swallowed endotracheal tube: A neonatal emergency. Case report', Military Medicine, vol. 146, no. 5, pp. 354-355.
Mack J, Matthews JM, Takamoto RM. Swallowed endotracheal tube: A neonatal emergency. Case report. Military Medicine. 1981 Dec 1;146(5):354-355.
Mack, John ; Matthews, J. M. ; Takamoto, R. M. / Swallowed endotracheal tube : A neonatal emergency. Case report. In: Military Medicine. 1981 ; Vol. 146, No. 5. pp. 354-355.
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