Symptomatic cystic degeneration of a clinically silent corticotroph tumor of the pituitary gland

Michael T. Walsh, William T. Couldwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinically silent corticotroph tumors of the pituitary gland are those tumors that stain for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) but do not manifest with clinical or laboratory features of Cushing disease. These tumors have been described as exhibiting more aggressive behavior than other nonfunctional pituitary tumors. We present an unusual case of a clinically silent corticotropic adenoma of the pituitary gland that underwent cystic degeneration following recurrence after transsphenoidal surgery and radiation therapy. The patient underwent left frontotemporal craniotomy with resection of the suprasellar mass and decompression of the left optic nerve. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated no further optic chiasm or nerve compression. Patients with clinically silent ACTH-secreting tumors should be monitored for aggressive tumor behavior and may require closer follow-up than those patients harboring other nonfunctional tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-370
Number of pages4
JournalSkull Base
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 23 2010

Fingerprint

Corticotrophs
Pituitary Gland
Neoplasms
Optic Nerve
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
Optic Chiasm
Pituitary ACTH Hypersecretion
Craniotomy
Pituitary Neoplasms
Decompression
Adenoma
Coloring Agents
Radiotherapy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Recurrence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Symptomatic cystic degeneration of a clinically silent corticotroph tumor of the pituitary gland. / Walsh, Michael T.; Couldwell, William T.

In: Skull Base, Vol. 20, No. 5, 23.08.2010, p. 367-370.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ab359016a083416eb0fbbd9390896b1a,
title = "Symptomatic cystic degeneration of a clinically silent corticotroph tumor of the pituitary gland",
abstract = "Clinically silent corticotroph tumors of the pituitary gland are those tumors that stain for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) but do not manifest with clinical or laboratory features of Cushing disease. These tumors have been described as exhibiting more aggressive behavior than other nonfunctional pituitary tumors. We present an unusual case of a clinically silent corticotropic adenoma of the pituitary gland that underwent cystic degeneration following recurrence after transsphenoidal surgery and radiation therapy. The patient underwent left frontotemporal craniotomy with resection of the suprasellar mass and decompression of the left optic nerve. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated no further optic chiasm or nerve compression. Patients with clinically silent ACTH-secreting tumors should be monitored for aggressive tumor behavior and may require closer follow-up than those patients harboring other nonfunctional tumors.",
author = "Walsh, {Michael T.} and Couldwell, {William T.}",
year = "2010",
month = "8",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1055/s-0030-1253579",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "367--370",
journal = "Journal of Neurological Surgery, Part B: Skull Base",
issn = "2193-6331",
publisher = "Thieme Medical Publishers",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Symptomatic cystic degeneration of a clinically silent corticotroph tumor of the pituitary gland

AU - Walsh, Michael T.

AU - Couldwell, William T.

PY - 2010/8/23

Y1 - 2010/8/23

N2 - Clinically silent corticotroph tumors of the pituitary gland are those tumors that stain for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) but do not manifest with clinical or laboratory features of Cushing disease. These tumors have been described as exhibiting more aggressive behavior than other nonfunctional pituitary tumors. We present an unusual case of a clinically silent corticotropic adenoma of the pituitary gland that underwent cystic degeneration following recurrence after transsphenoidal surgery and radiation therapy. The patient underwent left frontotemporal craniotomy with resection of the suprasellar mass and decompression of the left optic nerve. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated no further optic chiasm or nerve compression. Patients with clinically silent ACTH-secreting tumors should be monitored for aggressive tumor behavior and may require closer follow-up than those patients harboring other nonfunctional tumors.

AB - Clinically silent corticotroph tumors of the pituitary gland are those tumors that stain for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) but do not manifest with clinical or laboratory features of Cushing disease. These tumors have been described as exhibiting more aggressive behavior than other nonfunctional pituitary tumors. We present an unusual case of a clinically silent corticotropic adenoma of the pituitary gland that underwent cystic degeneration following recurrence after transsphenoidal surgery and radiation therapy. The patient underwent left frontotemporal craniotomy with resection of the suprasellar mass and decompression of the left optic nerve. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated no further optic chiasm or nerve compression. Patients with clinically silent ACTH-secreting tumors should be monitored for aggressive tumor behavior and may require closer follow-up than those patients harboring other nonfunctional tumors.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77955700432&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77955700432&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1055/s-0030-1253579

DO - 10.1055/s-0030-1253579

M3 - Article

C2 - 21359002

AN - SCOPUS:77955700432

VL - 20

SP - 367

EP - 370

JO - Journal of Neurological Surgery, Part B: Skull Base

JF - Journal of Neurological Surgery, Part B: Skull Base

SN - 2193-6331

IS - 5

ER -