Synchrony Detection of Linguistic Stimuli in the Presence of Faces

Neuropsychological Implications for Language Development in ASD

Elena Patten, Jeffrey D. Labban, Devin Casenhiser, Catherine L. Cotton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may be impaired in their ability to detect audiovisual synchrony and their ability may be influenced by the nature of the stimuli. We investigated the possibility that synchrony detection is disrupted by the presence of human faces by testing children with ASD using a preferential looking language-based paradigm. Children with low language abilities were significantly worse at detecting synchrony when the stimuli include an unobscured face than when the face was obscured. Findings suggest that the presence of faces may make multisensory processing more difficult. Implications for interventions are discussed, particularly those targeting attention to faces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-374
Number of pages13
JournalDevelopmental Neuropsychology
Volume41
Issue number5-8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 16 2016

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Language Development
Linguistics
Aptitude
Language
Autism Spectrum Disorder

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Synchrony Detection of Linguistic Stimuli in the Presence of Faces : Neuropsychological Implications for Language Development in ASD. / Patten, Elena; Labban, Jeffrey D.; Casenhiser, Devin; Cotton, Catherine L.

In: Developmental Neuropsychology, Vol. 41, No. 5-8, 16.11.2016, p. 362-374.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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