Synthetic vascular grafts seeded with genetically modified endothelium in the dog

Evaluation of the effect of seeding technique and retroviral vector on cell persistence in vivo

Jill E. Sackman, Michael Freeman, Mark G. Petersen, Zuhair Allebban, Glenn P. Niemeyer, Clinton D. Lothrop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Unique characteristics of endothelium make it an attractive target cell for gene transfer. Genetically modified endothelial cells (ECs) seeded on synthetic vascular grafts offer the potential to control neointimal hyperplasia, decrease graft thrombogenicity and improve small diameter graft patency. This study addresses the issue of synthetic vascular graft colonization with endothelial cells transduced with noninducible retroviral marker genes in the dog. Autologous endothelial cells were enzymatically harvested and transduced with either the bacterial NeoR gene or human growth hormone gene using retroviral vectors. All transduced cells were positive by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification for the transduced gene sequence prior to graft seeding. Transduced ECs were seeded on Dacron grafts (n = 3) preclotted with autologous blood. These grafts exhibited complete endothelialization at times from 250 to 360 days. Recovered DNA, however, was negative for the transduced gene sequence when analyzed by PCR and Southern blotting. Expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) was evaluated (n = 8) using several different cell seeding protocols. Grafts were seeded at 3 densities (ranging from 6 × 103 to 1.5 × 105 cells/cm2) and 2 different adherence times. Seeding substrate was also evaluated. Grafts were either preclotted with whole blood or incubated with 20 or 120 μg/ml fibronectin for 60 min. Graft biopsies were evaluated from 2 to 52 wk. Limited endothelialization was present in 4 dogs as early as 2 wk, but never progressed to full luminal coverage. The remaining dogs failed to ever exhibit any luminal EC adherence. Two dogs with limited EC coverage had positive DNA by PCR for the NeoR gene sequence at 2 and 3 wk. In contrast to transduced EC's, nontransduced EC colonization of ePTFE was complete at 2 wk when seeded under conditions that transduced cells had failed to persist. Neither seeding density, adherence time, seeding substrate or retroviral vector used influenced the uniformly poor graft coverage seen with transduced cells. Results of this study indicate that despite successful gene transfer using 4 different retroviral vectors, transduced endothelial cells seeded under varying conditions appear altered in their ability to stably adhere and colonize synthetic vascular grafts in vivo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-235
Number of pages17
JournalCell Transplantation
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Grafts
Endothelium
Blood Vessels
Endothelial cells
Dogs
Transplants
Endothelial Cells
Genes
Polymerase chain reaction
Gene transfer
Polytetrafluoroethylene
Polytetrafluoroethylenes
Polymerase Chain Reaction
DNA
Blood
Bacterial Genes
Polyethylene Terephthalates
Human Growth Hormone
Biopsy
Gene Amplification

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Cell Biology
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Synthetic vascular grafts seeded with genetically modified endothelium in the dog : Evaluation of the effect of seeding technique and retroviral vector on cell persistence in vivo. / Sackman, Jill E.; Freeman, Michael; Petersen, Mark G.; Allebban, Zuhair; Niemeyer, Glenn P.; Lothrop, Clinton D.

In: Cell Transplantation, Vol. 4, No. 2, 01.01.1995, p. 219-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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