Tailoring cancer education and support programs for low-income, Primarily African American Cancer Survivors

Michelle Martin, Lori A. Pollack, Mary B. Evans, Judith Lee Smith, Polly Kratt, Heather Prayor-Patterson, Christopher D. Watson, Mark Dignan, Lydia C. Cheney, Maria Pisu, Amandiy Liwo, Sandral Hullett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose/Objectives: To identify the information and stress-management topics of most interest to low-income, predominantly African American cancer survivors. Research Approach: Descriptive, cross sectional. Setting: Outpatient oncology clinic in a public hospital in Birmingham, Alabama. Participants: 25 patients with cancer; 12 were men, 22 were African Americans, and 16 had a 12th-grade education or less. Methodologic Approach: Patients ranked potential topics to be included in an educational curriculum. Main Research Variables: Quantitative rankings of information and stress-management priorities. Findings: Learning about cancer, understanding cancer treatments, relieving cancer pain, and keeping well in mind and body were the most highly ranked topics among those offered within the American Cancer Society's I Can Cope curriculum, which also included supportive topics such as mobilizing social support. The preferred stress-management topics were humor therapy, music therapy, meditation, and relaxation; lower-ranked topics included pet therapy and art as therapy. Conclusions: Cancer survivors appear most interested in topics specific to their illness and treatment versus supportive topics. Stress management also received high rankings. Interpretation: Nurses have a key role in providing patient education and support. Tailoring education programs may better target specific needs and improve the quality of cancer care of underserved patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalOncology Nursing Forum
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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African Americans
Survivors
Education
Neoplasms
Information Management
Curriculum
Animal Assisted Therapy
Art Therapy
Music Therapy
Meditation
Wit and Humor
Quality of Health Care
Public Hospitals
Vulnerable Populations
Patient Education
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Research
Social Support
Therapeutics
Nurses

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Tailoring cancer education and support programs for low-income, Primarily African American Cancer Survivors. / Martin, Michelle; Pollack, Lori A.; Evans, Mary B.; Smith, Judith Lee; Kratt, Polly; Prayor-Patterson, Heather; Watson, Christopher D.; Dignan, Mark; Cheney, Lydia C.; Pisu, Maria; Liwo, Amandiy; Hullett, Sandral.

In: Oncology Nursing Forum, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.01.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Martin, M, Pollack, LA, Evans, MB, Smith, JL, Kratt, P, Prayor-Patterson, H, Watson, CD, Dignan, M, Cheney, LC, Pisu, M, Liwo, A & Hullett, S 2011, 'Tailoring cancer education and support programs for low-income, Primarily African American Cancer Survivors', Oncology Nursing Forum, vol. 38, no. 1. https://doi.org/10.1188/11.ONF.E55-E59
Martin, Michelle ; Pollack, Lori A. ; Evans, Mary B. ; Smith, Judith Lee ; Kratt, Polly ; Prayor-Patterson, Heather ; Watson, Christopher D. ; Dignan, Mark ; Cheney, Lydia C. ; Pisu, Maria ; Liwo, Amandiy ; Hullett, Sandral. / Tailoring cancer education and support programs for low-income, Primarily African American Cancer Survivors. In: Oncology Nursing Forum. 2011 ; Vol. 38, No. 1.
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