Taste change after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding

David S. Tichansky, John Boughter, Atul K. Madan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Many patients have described changes in taste perception after weight loss surgery. Our hypothesis was that patients develop postoperative changes in taste that vary by bariatric procedure. Methods: Patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) or laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) completed a 23-question institutional review board-approved survey postoperatively regarding their degree and type of taste changes and food aversion and how these influenced their eating habits. Results: A total of 127 patients participated. After removing the inadequately completed surveys, 82 LRYGB and 28 LAGB patients were included. Of these, 87% of LRYGB and 69% of LAGB patients believed taste is important to the enjoyment of food. More LRYGB patients (82%) than LAGB patients (46%) reported a change in the taste of food or beverages after surgery (P <.001). In addition, 92% of LAGB versus 59% of LRYGB patients characterized the change as a decrease in the intensity of taste (P <.05). Additionally, 68% of LRYGB and 67% of LAGB patients found certain foods repulsive and had developed aversions. Also, 66% of LRYGB and 70% of LAGB patients believed the taste changes were greater than expected preoperatively. Most patients (83% of LRYGB and 69% of LAGB patients) agreed that the loss of taste led to better weight loss. Conclusion: Although most LRYGB and many LAGB patients experienced taste changes and food repulsion postoperatively, procedural differences were found in these taste changes. Taste changes need to be investigated further as a possible mechanism of weight loss after bariatric surgery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)440-444
Number of pages5
JournalSurgery for Obesity and Related Diseases
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2006

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Gastric Bypass
Stomach
Weight Loss
Food
Taste Perception
Bariatrics
Food and Beverages
Bariatric Surgery
Research Ethics Committees
Feeding Behavior

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery

Cite this

Taste change after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding. / Tichansky, David S.; Boughter, John; Madan, Atul K.

In: Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, Vol. 2, No. 4, 01.07.2006, p. 440-444.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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