Teaching Radiology Resident Didactics Using Videoconferencing. Development of a Videoconferencing Network to Increase the Efficiency of Radiology Resident Training

Darlene F. Metter, F. Ross Woolley, Yong Bradley, John Morrison, William T. Phillips, Umber Salman, Daniel Duffy, Reed Smith, Jess Graham, Gerald D. Dodd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is a major evolution in radiology perhaps most clearly evidenced by the advent of all digital, filmless imaging. Advanced imaging devices coupled with readers that permit real-time interpretation fit well into the videoconferencing paradigm. The study by Durfee et al. (11) demonstrated that the availability of the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) was likely to increase the use of electronic teaching devices throughout radiology departments. The acquisition of teaching files has become an entirely different process than it was just 5 or 6 years ago. No longer will it be necessary to spend hours searching for films and organizing them in a tedious process in order to incorporate them into lectures. An additional benefit is increased security. It is now possible to store multiple copies of a teaching file in several geographically separate areas. The expression surfing the file room for good teaching cases will now likely be changed to "surfing the PACS" (12, 13). It has been asserted that the paradigm shift to an all-digital environment will bring about substantial changes in what is required to provide radiology residents with an optimal education (14). The RLN videoconferencing format is in an ideal position to play an important role in effecting those changes that are moving radiology into its revolutionary future. This project grew out of the changing needs, time commitments, and technological innovations that are commonplace in academic radiology programs. Although there are some elements of the RLN that are unique, for the most part the system is replicable by programs where residents rotate away from their home institution and there is an opportunity for collaboration. The videoconference incorporates a number of skills important to the radiologist of the future by promoting exposure to and expertise in the filmless world that will continue to increase as the program matures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1276-1285
Number of pages10
JournalAcademic Radiology
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2006

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Videoconferencing
Radiology
Teaching
Radiology Information Systems
Inventions
Equipment and Supplies
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Teaching Radiology Resident Didactics Using Videoconferencing. Development of a Videoconferencing Network to Increase the Efficiency of Radiology Resident Training. / Metter, Darlene F.; Woolley, F. Ross; Bradley, Yong; Morrison, John; Phillips, William T.; Salman, Umber; Duffy, Daniel; Smith, Reed; Graham, Jess; Dodd, Gerald D.

In: Academic Radiology, Vol. 13, No. 10, 01.10.2006, p. 1276-1285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Metter, DF, Woolley, FR, Bradley, Y, Morrison, J, Phillips, WT, Salman, U, Duffy, D, Smith, R, Graham, J & Dodd, GD 2006, 'Teaching Radiology Resident Didactics Using Videoconferencing. Development of a Videoconferencing Network to Increase the Efficiency of Radiology Resident Training', Academic Radiology, vol. 13, no. 10, pp. 1276-1285. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acra.2006.06.023
Metter, Darlene F. ; Woolley, F. Ross ; Bradley, Yong ; Morrison, John ; Phillips, William T. ; Salman, Umber ; Duffy, Daniel ; Smith, Reed ; Graham, Jess ; Dodd, Gerald D. / Teaching Radiology Resident Didactics Using Videoconferencing. Development of a Videoconferencing Network to Increase the Efficiency of Radiology Resident Training. In: Academic Radiology. 2006 ; Vol. 13, No. 10. pp. 1276-1285.
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