Team-based learning in US colleges and schools of pharmacy

Rondall E. Allen, Jeffrey Copeland, Andrea Franks, Reza Karimi, Marianne McCollum, David J. Riese, Anne Y.F. Lin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To characterize the use of team-based learning (TBL) in US colleges and schools of pharmacy, including factors that may affect implementation and perceptions of faculty members regarding the impact of TBL on educational outcomes. Methods. Respondents identified factors that inhibit or enable TBL use and its impact on student learning. Results were stratified by type of institution (public/private), class size, and TBL experience. Results. Sixty-nine of 100 faculty members (69%) representing 43 (86%) institutions responded. Major factors considered to enable TBL implementation included a single campus and student and administration buy-in. Inhibiting factors included distant campuses, faculty resistance, and lack of training. Compared with traditional lectures, TBL is perceived to enhance student engagement, improve students' preparation for class, and promote achievement of course outcomes. In addition, TBL is perceived to be more effective than lectures at fostering learning in all 6 domains of Bloom's Taxonomy. Conclusions. Despite potential implementation challenges, faculty members perceive that TBL improves student engagement and learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number115
JournalAmerican journal of pharmaceutical education
Volume77
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 20 2013

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Pharmacy Schools
Learning
school
learning
Students
student
Foster Home Care
Resistance Training
public institution
taxonomy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Allen, R. E., Copeland, J., Franks, A., Karimi, R., McCollum, M., Riese, D. J., & Lin, A. Y. F. (2013). Team-based learning in US colleges and schools of pharmacy. American journal of pharmaceutical education, 77(6), [115]. https://doi.org/10.5688/ajpe776115

Team-based learning in US colleges and schools of pharmacy. / Allen, Rondall E.; Copeland, Jeffrey; Franks, Andrea; Karimi, Reza; McCollum, Marianne; Riese, David J.; Lin, Anne Y.F.

In: American journal of pharmaceutical education, Vol. 77, No. 6, 115, 20.08.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allen, RE, Copeland, J, Franks, A, Karimi, R, McCollum, M, Riese, DJ & Lin, AYF 2013, 'Team-based learning in US colleges and schools of pharmacy', American journal of pharmaceutical education, vol. 77, no. 6, 115. https://doi.org/10.5688/ajpe776115
Allen, Rondall E. ; Copeland, Jeffrey ; Franks, Andrea ; Karimi, Reza ; McCollum, Marianne ; Riese, David J. ; Lin, Anne Y.F. / Team-based learning in US colleges and schools of pharmacy. In: American journal of pharmaceutical education. 2013 ; Vol. 77, No. 6.
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