Technical complications of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair

T. C. Naslund, William Edwards, D. F. Neuzil, R. S. Martin, Jr Snyder, Jr Mulherin, M. Failor, K. McPherson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    Purpose: Results from 34 endovascular repairs of abdominal aortic aneurysms are reviewed to identify technical complications and relate them to anatomic and technical features of the operation. Methods: Twenty-one patients underwent attempted tube graft repair (mean follow-up, 13 months). Thirteen patients underwent placement of a bifurcated graft (mean follow-up, 7.2 months). Results: Twenty-five patients (74%) underwent repair without technical complication (16 tube graft and nine bifurcated graft). Of five patients who had tube graft complications, two involved small iliac arteries and resulted in arterial injury. One of these patients needed a femorofemoral bypass procedure, and the other required conversion to standard operation. Two patients had distal leaks associated with the attachment system, and one patient had misplacement of the distal attachment system. The two patients who had leaks were followed-up; one required operation after 7 months, whereas the other leak sealed. The patient who had distal attachment system misplacement had a second endograft placed within the first to provide a distal seal. The four patients who had bifurcated graft complications involved two graft limb stenoses, one managed with a Palmaz stent and the other with balloon angioplasty. The patient treated with balloon angioplasty had graft thrombosis 1 week after the operation, which resulted in the need for a femorofemoral bypass procedure. Another bifurcated graft patient had a graft limb twist, which has resulted in chronic claudication. One patient had placement of a limb too proximal in the common iliac artery with chronic leak, and an open operation was performed 18 months later. Conclusions: Technical complications in this series seem to be associated with short distal necks, small lilac arteries, tortuous lilac arteries, and atherosclerosis at the aortic bifurcation. We believe that experience and understanding of these issues will reduce the risk of these complications in the future.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)502-510
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
    Volume26
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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    Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
    Transplants
    Balloon Angioplasty
    Extremities
    Iliac Artery
    Arteries
    Stents
    Atherosclerosis
    Pathologic Constriction
    Thrombosis

    All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

    • Surgery
    • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

    Cite this

    Naslund, T. C., Edwards, W., Neuzil, D. F., Martin, R. S., Snyder, J., Mulherin, J., ... McPherson, K. (1997). Technical complications of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 26(3), 502-510. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0741-5214(97)70043-0

    Technical complications of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. / Naslund, T. C.; Edwards, William; Neuzil, D. F.; Martin, R. S.; Snyder, Jr; Mulherin, Jr; Failor, M.; McPherson, K.

    In: Journal of Vascular Surgery, Vol. 26, No. 3, 01.01.1997, p. 502-510.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Naslund, TC, Edwards, W, Neuzil, DF, Martin, RS, Snyder, J, Mulherin, J, Failor, M & McPherson, K 1997, 'Technical complications of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair', Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 502-510. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0741-5214(97)70043-0
    Naslund TC, Edwards W, Neuzil DF, Martin RS, Snyder J, Mulherin J et al. Technical complications of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1997 Jan 1;26(3):502-510. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0741-5214(97)70043-0
    Naslund, T. C. ; Edwards, William ; Neuzil, D. F. ; Martin, R. S. ; Snyder, Jr ; Mulherin, Jr ; Failor, M. ; McPherson, K. / Technical complications of endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. In: Journal of Vascular Surgery. 1997 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 502-510.
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    AU - Naslund, T. C.

    AU - Edwards, William

    AU - Neuzil, D. F.

    AU - Martin, R. S.

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    AU - Mulherin, Jr

    AU - Failor, M.

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