Temporomandibular joint noises in infants

Review of the literature and report of cases

Samuel J. Razook, Jack Gotcher, Robert A. Bays

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function and dysfunction in infants and children are poorly understood. some reports of dysfunction in children and adolescents have appeared in the literature; however, no contemporary reports of TMJ dysfunction in infants have been published. Here we describe three cases of TMJ noises that may represent an anatomic abnormality. Patients' ages at onset were 3 days, 5 months, and 6 months. All noises occurred in the apparent absence of trauma and without other clinical findings. Two cases resolved spontaneously over a 2- to 5-month period. One case is still occurring, but the frequency is decreasing with age. In all cases there was no history of distress on the part of the child during mandibular movements or when the noises occurred. Included is a review of the literature and hypotheses of the etiology of TMJ noises in infants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)658-664
Number of pages7
JournalOral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology
Volume67
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Temporomandibular Joint
Noise
Age of Onset
Wounds and Injuries

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Temporomandibular joint noises in infants : Review of the literature and report of cases. / Razook, Samuel J.; Gotcher, Jack; Bays, Robert A.

In: Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Vol. 67, No. 6, 01.01.1989, p. 658-664.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{737590e85eda4ba4bf55e87753c9025c,
title = "Temporomandibular joint noises in infants: Review of the literature and report of cases",
abstract = "Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function and dysfunction in infants and children are poorly understood. some reports of dysfunction in children and adolescents have appeared in the literature; however, no contemporary reports of TMJ dysfunction in infants have been published. Here we describe three cases of TMJ noises that may represent an anatomic abnormality. Patients' ages at onset were 3 days, 5 months, and 6 months. All noises occurred in the apparent absence of trauma and without other clinical findings. Two cases resolved spontaneously over a 2- to 5-month period. One case is still occurring, but the frequency is decreasing with age. In all cases there was no history of distress on the part of the child during mandibular movements or when the noises occurred. Included is a review of the literature and hypotheses of the etiology of TMJ noises in infants.",
author = "Razook, {Samuel J.} and Jack Gotcher and Bays, {Robert A.}",
year = "1989",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0030-4220(89)90004-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "67",
pages = "658--664",
journal = "Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology",
issn = "2212-4403",
publisher = "Elsevier USA",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Temporomandibular joint noises in infants

T2 - Review of the literature and report of cases

AU - Razook, Samuel J.

AU - Gotcher, Jack

AU - Bays, Robert A.

PY - 1989/1/1

Y1 - 1989/1/1

N2 - Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function and dysfunction in infants and children are poorly understood. some reports of dysfunction in children and adolescents have appeared in the literature; however, no contemporary reports of TMJ dysfunction in infants have been published. Here we describe three cases of TMJ noises that may represent an anatomic abnormality. Patients' ages at onset were 3 days, 5 months, and 6 months. All noises occurred in the apparent absence of trauma and without other clinical findings. Two cases resolved spontaneously over a 2- to 5-month period. One case is still occurring, but the frequency is decreasing with age. In all cases there was no history of distress on the part of the child during mandibular movements or when the noises occurred. Included is a review of the literature and hypotheses of the etiology of TMJ noises in infants.

AB - Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function and dysfunction in infants and children are poorly understood. some reports of dysfunction in children and adolescents have appeared in the literature; however, no contemporary reports of TMJ dysfunction in infants have been published. Here we describe three cases of TMJ noises that may represent an anatomic abnormality. Patients' ages at onset were 3 days, 5 months, and 6 months. All noises occurred in the apparent absence of trauma and without other clinical findings. Two cases resolved spontaneously over a 2- to 5-month period. One case is still occurring, but the frequency is decreasing with age. In all cases there was no history of distress on the part of the child during mandibular movements or when the noises occurred. Included is a review of the literature and hypotheses of the etiology of TMJ noises in infants.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0024687160&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0024687160&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0030-4220(89)90004-2

DO - 10.1016/0030-4220(89)90004-2

M3 - Article

VL - 67

SP - 658

EP - 664

JO - Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology

JF - Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology and Oral Radiology

SN - 2212-4403

IS - 6

ER -