Tennessee emergency medicine workforce, 2009.

Amy J. Keenum, Luke M. Rawlings, Agricola Odoi, Michael G. Wortley, Leonard Lamsen, Louis Jones, Lorraine S. Wallace

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Describe the characteristics of the Tennessee (TN) Emergency Medicine (EM) workforce. Methods: A cross-sectional mail survey of all non-government emergency departments (EDs) in TN was performed between January and April 2009. Data collected included: number and residency training of physicians, ED volume, employment and type of mid-level providers. Survey datawere compared to recent national EM workforce data. Subgroup analysis of rural EDs using Rural-Urban Commuting Area Code (RUCA) criteria was conducted. We received responses from 50 of the 100 emergency departments surveyed. Roughly half (53 percent) were rural, based on RUCA criteria. Mid-level providers worked with physicians in 31 departments, with physician assistants(PAs) being employed more commonly than nurse practitioners(NPs). Paramedics and emergency medical technicians (EMTs) were employed less frequently. Most EM residency trained physicians in Tennessee are working in EDs with approximately 39,000 annual visits per year or greater. Subspecialty physicians such as neurosurgeons, gastroenterologists and otorhinolaryngologists are generally not available to rural EDs, except by patient transfer, illustrating the marked differences in the work environments. While there is clearly a need for more emergency medicine residency training programs in Tennessee, the need to continue to provide advanced training for family medicine residency trained physicians is also clear. Family medicine doctors provide most of the rural emergency medicine in Tennessee.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)41-43
Number of pages3
JournalUnknown Journal
Volume106
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 2013

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Emergency Medicine
Hospital Emergency Service
Internship and Residency
Physicians
Emergency Medical Technicians
Medicine
Physician Assistants
Patient Transfer
Allied Health Personnel
Nurse Practitioners
Postal Service
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Keenum, A. J., Rawlings, L. M., Odoi, A., Wortley, M. G., Lamsen, L., Jones, L., & Wallace, L. S. (2013). Tennessee emergency medicine workforce, 2009. Unknown Journal, 106(3), 41-43.

Tennessee emergency medicine workforce, 2009. / Keenum, Amy J.; Rawlings, Luke M.; Odoi, Agricola; Wortley, Michael G.; Lamsen, Leonard; Jones, Louis; Wallace, Lorraine S.

In: Unknown Journal, Vol. 106, No. 3, 01.01.2013, p. 41-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keenum, AJ, Rawlings, LM, Odoi, A, Wortley, MG, Lamsen, L, Jones, L & Wallace, LS 2013, 'Tennessee emergency medicine workforce, 2009.', Unknown Journal, vol. 106, no. 3, pp. 41-43.
Keenum AJ, Rawlings LM, Odoi A, Wortley MG, Lamsen L, Jones L et al. Tennessee emergency medicine workforce, 2009. Unknown Journal. 2013 Jan 1;106(3):41-43.
Keenum, Amy J. ; Rawlings, Luke M. ; Odoi, Agricola ; Wortley, Michael G. ; Lamsen, Leonard ; Jones, Louis ; Wallace, Lorraine S. / Tennessee emergency medicine workforce, 2009. In: Unknown Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 106, No. 3. pp. 41-43.
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