Testing antismoking messages for Air Force trainees

Lucy Popova, Brittany D. Linde, Zoran Bursac, Gerald Talcott, Mary V. Modayil, Melissa Little, Pamela M. Ling, Stanton A. Glantz, Robert Klesges

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Young adults in the military are aggressively targeted by tobacco companies and are at high risk of tobacco use. Existing antismoking advertisements developed for the general population might be effective in educating young adults in the military. This study evaluated the effects of different themes of existing antismoking advertisements on perceived harm and intentions to use cigarettes and other tobacco products among Air Force trainees. Methods: In a pretest-post-test experiment, 782 Airmen were randomised to view antismoking advertisements in 1 of 6 conditions: anti-industry, health effects+anti-industry, sexual health, secondhand smoke, environment+anti-industry or control. We assessed the effect of different conditions on changes in perceived harm and intentions to use cigarettes, electronic cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, hookah and cigarillos from pretest to post-test with multivariable linear regression models (perceived harm) and zero-inflated Poisson regression model (intentions). Results: Antismoking advertisements increased perceived harm of various tobacco products and reduced intentions to use. Advertisements featuring negative effects of tobacco on health and sexual performance coupled with revealing tobacco industry manipulations had the most consistent pattern of effects on perceived harm and intentions. Conclusions: Antismoking advertisements produced for the general public might also be effective with a young adult military population and could have spillover effects on perceptions of harm and intentions to use other tobacco products besides cigarettes. Existing antismoking advertising may be a cost-effective tool to educate young adults in the military.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)656-663
Number of pages8
JournalTobacco Control
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Fingerprint

air force
trainee
nicotine
Tobacco Products
Air
Young Adult
young adult
Military
Industry
Reproductive Health
Tobacco
Linear Models
industry
Tobacco Industry
health industry
Smokeless Tobacco
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
regression
Tobacco Use
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Popova, L., Linde, B. D., Bursac, Z., Talcott, G., Modayil, M. V., Little, M., ... Klesges, R. (2016). Testing antismoking messages for Air Force trainees. Tobacco Control, 25(6), 656-663. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2015-052477

Testing antismoking messages for Air Force trainees. / Popova, Lucy; Linde, Brittany D.; Bursac, Zoran; Talcott, Gerald; Modayil, Mary V.; Little, Melissa; Ling, Pamela M.; Glantz, Stanton A.; Klesges, Robert.

In: Tobacco Control, Vol. 25, No. 6, 01.11.2016, p. 656-663.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Popova, L, Linde, BD, Bursac, Z, Talcott, G, Modayil, MV, Little, M, Ling, PM, Glantz, SA & Klesges, R 2016, 'Testing antismoking messages for Air Force trainees', Tobacco Control, vol. 25, no. 6, pp. 656-663. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2015-052477
Popova L, Linde BD, Bursac Z, Talcott G, Modayil MV, Little M et al. Testing antismoking messages for Air Force trainees. Tobacco Control. 2016 Nov 1;25(6):656-663. https://doi.org/10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2015-052477
Popova, Lucy ; Linde, Brittany D. ; Bursac, Zoran ; Talcott, Gerald ; Modayil, Mary V. ; Little, Melissa ; Ling, Pamela M. ; Glantz, Stanton A. ; Klesges, Robert. / Testing antismoking messages for Air Force trainees. In: Tobacco Control. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 6. pp. 656-663.
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