Testis biopsies frequently demonstrate sperm in men with azoospermia and significantly elevated follicle-stimulating hormone levels

Edward Kim, Jay H. Gilbaugh, Vipul R. Patel, Paul J. Turek, Larry I. Lipshultz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Purpose: Men with azoospermia, markedly elevated serum follicle- stimulating hormone levels and testicular atrophy were previously considered irreversibly infertile. Thus, testicular biopsy in this patient population was considered unnecessary. However, presently men with even the most severe infertility disorders are potentially able to initiate a pregnancy with intracytoplasmic sperm injection provided sperm can be recovered in even relatively few numbers directly from the testicular tissue. For these reasons we sought to reevaluate the findings from testicular biopsies in these men in the era of advanced micromanipulation techniques. Materials and Methods: Chart review identified men with azoospermia, confirmed on a pelleted specimen, and a serum follicle-stimulating hormone level of 3 or more times normal. Mature sperm in the touch preparation cytology and testis biopsy specimen were confirmed. Results: A total of 57 men, most with testicular atrophy, underwent a testicular biopsy and in 17 (30%) mature sperm were identified. The most common diagnosis in these men was severe hypospermatogenesis. Men without sperm most commonly had a pure Sertoli- cell-only pattern. Conclusions: Men with azoospermia and testicular atrophy with significantly elevated follicle-stimulating hormone levels should undergo testicular biopsy if in vitro fertilization with intracytoplasmic sperm injection is an acceptable approach for the couple.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-146
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume157
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

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Azoospermia
Follicle Stimulating Hormone
Spermatozoa
Testis
Biopsy
Atrophy
Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injections
Micromanipulation
Oligospermia
Sertoli Cells
Touch
Fertilization in Vitro
Serum
Infertility
Cell Biology
Pregnancy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Urology

Cite this

Testis biopsies frequently demonstrate sperm in men with azoospermia and significantly elevated follicle-stimulating hormone levels. / Kim, Edward; Gilbaugh, Jay H.; Patel, Vipul R.; Turek, Paul J.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 157, No. 1, 01.01.1997, p. 144-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Edward ; Gilbaugh, Jay H. ; Patel, Vipul R. ; Turek, Paul J. ; Lipshultz, Larry I. / Testis biopsies frequently demonstrate sperm in men with azoospermia and significantly elevated follicle-stimulating hormone levels. In: Journal of Urology. 1997 ; Vol. 157, No. 1. pp. 144-146.
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