Thalamocortical communication in the awake mouse visual system involves phase synchronization and rhythmic spike synchrony at high gamma frequencies

Samuel S. McAfee, Yu Liu, Mukesh Dhamala, Detlef Heck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the neocortex, communication between neurons is heavily influenced by the activity of the surrounding network, with communication efficacy increasing when population patterns are oscillatory and coherent. Less is known about whether coherent oscillations are essential for conveyance of thalamic input to the neocortex in awake animals. Here we investigated whether visual-evoked oscillations and spikes in the primary visual cortex (V1) were aligned with those in the visual thalamus (dLGN). Using simultaneous recordings of visual-evoked activity in V1 and dLGN we demonstrate that thalamocortical communication involves synchronized local field potential oscillations in the high gamma range (50–90 Hz) which correspond uniquely to precise dLGN-V1 spike synchrony. These results provide evidence of a role for high gamma oscillations in mediating thalamocortical communication in the visual pathway of mice, analogous to beta oscillations in primates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number837
JournalFrontiers in Neuroscience
Volume12
Issue numberNOV
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 22 2018

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Communication
Neocortex
Visual Pathways
Visual Cortex
Thalamus
Primates
Neurons
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "In the neocortex, communication between neurons is heavily influenced by the activity of the surrounding network, with communication efficacy increasing when population patterns are oscillatory and coherent. Less is known about whether coherent oscillations are essential for conveyance of thalamic input to the neocortex in awake animals. Here we investigated whether visual-evoked oscillations and spikes in the primary visual cortex (V1) were aligned with those in the visual thalamus (dLGN). Using simultaneous recordings of visual-evoked activity in V1 and dLGN we demonstrate that thalamocortical communication involves synchronized local field potential oscillations in the high gamma range (50–90 Hz) which correspond uniquely to precise dLGN-V1 spike synchrony. These results provide evidence of a role for high gamma oscillations in mediating thalamocortical communication in the visual pathway of mice, analogous to beta oscillations in primates.",
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