The association of smoking and the cost of military training

Robert Klesges, C. Keith Haddock, Cyril F. Chang, Gerald Talcott, Harry A. Lando

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

52 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine if premature discharge from the US Air Force was associated with the smoking status of recruits. Design and setting - A total of 29 044 US Air Force personnel recruited from August 1995 to August 1996 were administered baseline behavioural risk assessment surveys during basic military training. They were tracked over a 12 month period to determine those who were prematurely discharged. Main outcome measures - Excess training costs as a result of premature discharge. Results - In this 12 month period, 14.0% of those entering the US Air Force were discharged at a one year follow up. In both univariate and multivariate models, the best single predictor of early discharge was smoking status. Overall, 11.8% of non-smokers versus 19.4% of smokers were prematurely discharged (relative risk 1.795). Conclusions - Using US Department of Defense data on the cost of military training, recruits who smoke in the US Air Force are associated with $18 million per year in excess training costs. Applied to all service branches, smoking status, which represents a constellation of underlying behaviours and attitudes that can contribute to early discharge, is associated with over $ 130 million per year in excess training costs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)43-47
Number of pages5
JournalTobacco Control
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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air force
smoking
Smoking
Military
Costs and Cost Analysis
Air
costs
United States Department of Defense
Military Personnel
Smoke
risk assessment
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
personnel

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Klesges, R., Haddock, C. K., Chang, C. F., Talcott, G., & Lando, H. A. (2001). The association of smoking and the cost of military training. Tobacco Control, 10(1), 43-47. https://doi.org/10.1136/tc.10.1.43

The association of smoking and the cost of military training. / Klesges, Robert; Haddock, C. Keith; Chang, Cyril F.; Talcott, Gerald; Lando, Harry A.

In: Tobacco Control, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2001, p. 43-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klesges, R, Haddock, CK, Chang, CF, Talcott, G & Lando, HA 2001, 'The association of smoking and the cost of military training', Tobacco Control, vol. 10, no. 1, pp. 43-47. https://doi.org/10.1136/tc.10.1.43
Klesges R, Haddock CK, Chang CF, Talcott G, Lando HA. The association of smoking and the cost of military training. Tobacco Control. 2001 Jan 1;10(1):43-47. https://doi.org/10.1136/tc.10.1.43
Klesges, Robert ; Haddock, C. Keith ; Chang, Cyril F. ; Talcott, Gerald ; Lando, Harry A. / The association of smoking and the cost of military training. In: Tobacco Control. 2001 ; Vol. 10, No. 1. pp. 43-47.
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