The benefits of human-companion animal interaction

A review

Sandra B. Barker, Aaron Wolen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

99 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article provides a review of research published since 1980 on the benefits of human-companion animal interaction. Studies focusing on the benefits of pet ownership are presented first, followed by research on the benefits of interacting with companion animals that are not owned by the subject (animal-assisted activities). While most of the published studies are descriptive and have been conducted with convenience samples, a promising number of controlled studies support the health benefits of interacting with companion animals. Future research employing more rigorous designs and systematically building upon a clearly defined line of inquiry is needed to advance our knowledge of the benefits of human-companion animal interaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-495
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of veterinary medical education
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Pets
pets
animal
interaction
Ownership
Insurance Benefits
Research
animals
health
sampling

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

The benefits of human-companion animal interaction : A review. / Barker, Sandra B.; Wolen, Aaron.

In: Journal of veterinary medical education, Vol. 35, No. 4, 01.12.2008, p. 487-495.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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