The C-terminal tail of TRIM56 dictates antiviral restriction of influenza A and B viruses by impeding viral RNA synthesis

Baoming Liu, Nan L. Li, Yang Shen, Xiaoyong Bao, Thomas Fabrizio, Husni Elbahesh, Richard J. Webby, Kui Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Accumulating data suggest that tripartite-motif-containing (TRIM) proteins participate in host responses to viral infections, either by acting as direct antiviral restriction factors or through regulating innate immune signaling of the host. Of > 70 TRIMs, TRIM56 is a restriction factor of several positive-strand RNA viruses, including three members of the family Flaviviridae (yellow fever virus, dengue virus, and bovine viral diarrhea virus) and a human coronavirus (OC43), and this ability invariably depends upon the E3 ligase activity of TRIM56. However, the impact of TRIM56 on negative-strand RNA viruses remains unclear. Here, we show that TRIM56 puts a check on replication of influenza A and B viruses in cell culture but does not inhibit Sendai virus or human metapneumovirus, two paramyxoviruses. Interestingly, the anti-influenza virus activity was independent of the E3 ligase activity, B-box, or coiled-coil domain. Rather, deletion of a 63-residue-long C-terminal-tail portion of TRIM56 abrogated the antiviral function. Moreover, expression of this short C-terminal segment curtailed the replication of influenza viruses as effectively as that of full-length TRIM56. Mechanistically, TRIM56 was found to specifically impede intracellular influenza virus RNA synthesis. Together, these data reveal a novel antiviral activity of TRIM56 against influenza A and B viruses and provide insights into the mechanism by which TRIM56 restricts these medically important orthomyxoviruses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4369-4382
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume90
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Fingerprint

Influenza B virus
Influenza A virus
Viral RNA
Orthomyxoviridae
Antiviral Agents
tail
RNA
Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
synthesis
RNA Viruses
ligases
Human coronavirus OC43
Human Coronavirus OC43
Human metapneumovirus
Yellow fever virus
Flaviviridae
Metapneumovirus
Sendai virus
Bovine Viral Diarrhea Viruses
Respirovirus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Immunology
  • Virology

Cite this

The C-terminal tail of TRIM56 dictates antiviral restriction of influenza A and B viruses by impeding viral RNA synthesis. / Liu, Baoming; Li, Nan L.; Shen, Yang; Bao, Xiaoyong; Fabrizio, Thomas; Elbahesh, Husni; Webby, Richard J.; Li, Kui.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 90, No. 9, 01.05.2016, p. 4369-4382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Liu, Baoming ; Li, Nan L. ; Shen, Yang ; Bao, Xiaoyong ; Fabrizio, Thomas ; Elbahesh, Husni ; Webby, Richard J. ; Li, Kui. / The C-terminal tail of TRIM56 dictates antiviral restriction of influenza A and B viruses by impeding viral RNA synthesis. In: Journal of Virology. 2016 ; Vol. 90, No. 9. pp. 4369-4382.
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