The cells and molecules that make a cerebellum

Dan Goldowitz, Kristin Hamre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

387 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The molecular underpinnings of cerebellar development are being established through the identification of naturally occurring mutated genes and the knockout of other genes. Sets of genes expressed in the regions of the mes- and metencephalon have been shown to play a crucial role in specifying the cerebellar anlage. Other genes have been shown to be crucial to early granule-cell development, migration of Purkinje and granule cells, and neuron-glia interactions. However, the process of development will ultimately be understood in terms of cellular interactions and the roles that each cell type plays in the assembly of cerebellar structure. One of the most important interactions is between granule and Purkinje cells. This relationship has been shown to be crucial for the control of cell number, migration of neuroblasts and cell differentiation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)375-382
Number of pages8
JournalTrends in neurosciences
Volume21
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1998

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Purkinje Cells
Cerebellum
Cell Movement
Metencephalon
Genes
Gene Knockout Techniques
Mesencephalon
Neuroglia
Cell Differentiation
Cell Count

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The cells and molecules that make a cerebellum. / Goldowitz, Dan; Hamre, Kristin.

In: Trends in neurosciences, Vol. 21, No. 9, 01.09.1998, p. 375-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldowitz, Dan ; Hamre, Kristin. / The cells and molecules that make a cerebellum. In: Trends in neurosciences. 1998 ; Vol. 21, No. 9. pp. 375-382.
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