The certifying examination of the american board of surgery: The effect of improving communication and professional competency: Twenty-year results

Pamela Rowland, Thadeus L. Trus, Nicholas P. Lang, Horace Henriques, William P. Reed, Parvis J. Sadighi, John E. Sutton, Adnan A. Alseidi, Michael J. Cahalane, Jeffrey M. Gauvin, Walter E. Pofahl, Kennith H. Sartorelli, Steven B. Goldin, A. Gerson Greenburg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1985, a small research group identified variables affecting applicant success on the oral Certifying Examination (CE) of the American Board of Surgery (ABS). This led to the design of an oral examination course first taught in 1991. The success of and need for this program led to its continuation. The results from the first 10 years were presented at the 2001 Association of Program Directors in Surgery annual meeting. 1 We now report the outcomes for the course of the second 10 years as measured by success on the CE. Thirty-six courses were held over 20 years. There were 57 invited faculty from 27 general surgery programs throughout the United States and Canada. The participant-to-faculty ratio ranged from 16:7 to 5:1 in the newer 3-day format (2007). Courses were offered at sites that replicated the actual examination setting. Each course included (1) pretest and posttest examinations, (2) analysis of case presentation skills, (3) measurement of communication apprehension, (4) 1:1 faculty feedback, (5) small-group practice sessions, (6) individual videotaping, (7) didactic review of specific behaviors on examinations, (8) a debrief session with two faculty members, and (9) a written evaluative summary that included an improvement strategy. There were 36 courses with 326 participants (30-54 years). Follow-up data are available for 225 participants. Trends were analyzed between 1991-2001 and 2002-2011. As resident performance on the CE increased in importance, applicant profiles changed from those who had previously failed (1991-2001) to residents identified by program directors as needing assistance (52%). Since 2002, most course participants (69%) who had failed the CE had completed at least 1 other review course. Participants reported more significant stressors (2002-2011) 9%, but communication apprehension remained the same. As a result, individual counseling for anger and family stressors was integrated into the course. The perception of knowledge deficits was associated with those who enrolled in fellowship training and delayed their examination. The recent groups exhibited more professionalism and articulation issues related to performance. Five surgeons (2002-2011) were asked not to return to the course because of severe knowledge deficiencies or ethical/behavioral issues based on faculty evaluations. Although complete follow-up of all participants was not possible (only 225/326), the success rate among those providing follow-up was 97% for those who followed their remediation plan, giving 218/326, a worse-case pass rate of 67%. Communication and professionalism deficits are still common in those struggling with the CE, Early identification of those at risk of failing by program directors who are documenting the competencies may promote earlier interventions and thus lead to success. This program continues to be effective at identifying behaviors that interfere with success on the CE of the ABS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)118-125
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
Volume69
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

surgery
Communication
examination
communication
Oral Diagnosis
Group Practice
director
Anger
Ethics
applicant
Canada
Counseling
deficit
small group research
resident
group practice
Research
anger
didactics
small group

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Education

Cite this

The certifying examination of the american board of surgery : The effect of improving communication and professional competency: Twenty-year results. / Rowland, Pamela; Trus, Thadeus L.; Lang, Nicholas P.; Henriques, Horace; Reed, William P.; Sadighi, Parvis J.; Sutton, John E.; Alseidi, Adnan A.; Cahalane, Michael J.; Gauvin, Jeffrey M.; Pofahl, Walter E.; Sartorelli, Kennith H.; Goldin, Steven B.; Greenburg, A. Gerson.

In: Journal of Surgical Education, Vol. 69, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 118-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rowland, P, Trus, TL, Lang, NP, Henriques, H, Reed, WP, Sadighi, PJ, Sutton, JE, Alseidi, AA, Cahalane, MJ, Gauvin, JM, Pofahl, WE, Sartorelli, KH, Goldin, SB & Greenburg, AG 2012, 'The certifying examination of the american board of surgery: The effect of improving communication and professional competency: Twenty-year results', Journal of Surgical Education, vol. 69, no. 1, pp. 118-125. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsurg.2011.09.012
Rowland, Pamela ; Trus, Thadeus L. ; Lang, Nicholas P. ; Henriques, Horace ; Reed, William P. ; Sadighi, Parvis J. ; Sutton, John E. ; Alseidi, Adnan A. ; Cahalane, Michael J. ; Gauvin, Jeffrey M. ; Pofahl, Walter E. ; Sartorelli, Kennith H. ; Goldin, Steven B. ; Greenburg, A. Gerson. / The certifying examination of the american board of surgery : The effect of improving communication and professional competency: Twenty-year results. In: Journal of Surgical Education. 2012 ; Vol. 69, No. 1. pp. 118-125.
@article{8f3c50c5b47b4c41bfe0cc3d01b3acce,
title = "The certifying examination of the american board of surgery: The effect of improving communication and professional competency: Twenty-year results",
abstract = "In 1985, a small research group identified variables affecting applicant success on the oral Certifying Examination (CE) of the American Board of Surgery (ABS). This led to the design of an oral examination course first taught in 1991. The success of and need for this program led to its continuation. The results from the first 10 years were presented at the 2001 Association of Program Directors in Surgery annual meeting. 1 We now report the outcomes for the course of the second 10 years as measured by success on the CE. Thirty-six courses were held over 20 years. There were 57 invited faculty from 27 general surgery programs throughout the United States and Canada. The participant-to-faculty ratio ranged from 16:7 to 5:1 in the newer 3-day format (2007). Courses were offered at sites that replicated the actual examination setting. Each course included (1) pretest and posttest examinations, (2) analysis of case presentation skills, (3) measurement of communication apprehension, (4) 1:1 faculty feedback, (5) small-group practice sessions, (6) individual videotaping, (7) didactic review of specific behaviors on examinations, (8) a debrief session with two faculty members, and (9) a written evaluative summary that included an improvement strategy. There were 36 courses with 326 participants (30-54 years). Follow-up data are available for 225 participants. Trends were analyzed between 1991-2001 and 2002-2011. As resident performance on the CE increased in importance, applicant profiles changed from those who had previously failed (1991-2001) to residents identified by program directors as needing assistance (52{\%}). Since 2002, most course participants (69{\%}) who had failed the CE had completed at least 1 other review course. Participants reported more significant stressors (2002-2011) 9{\%}, but communication apprehension remained the same. As a result, individual counseling for anger and family stressors was integrated into the course. The perception of knowledge deficits was associated with those who enrolled in fellowship training and delayed their examination. The recent groups exhibited more professionalism and articulation issues related to performance. Five surgeons (2002-2011) were asked not to return to the course because of severe knowledge deficiencies or ethical/behavioral issues based on faculty evaluations. Although complete follow-up of all participants was not possible (only 225/326), the success rate among those providing follow-up was 97{\%} for those who followed their remediation plan, giving 218/326, a worse-case pass rate of 67{\%}. Communication and professionalism deficits are still common in those struggling with the CE, Early identification of those at risk of failing by program directors who are documenting the competencies may promote earlier interventions and thus lead to success. This program continues to be effective at identifying behaviors that interfere with success on the CE of the ABS.",
author = "Pamela Rowland and Trus, {Thadeus L.} and Lang, {Nicholas P.} and Horace Henriques and Reed, {William P.} and Sadighi, {Parvis J.} and Sutton, {John E.} and Alseidi, {Adnan A.} and Cahalane, {Michael J.} and Gauvin, {Jeffrey M.} and Pofahl, {Walter E.} and Sartorelli, {Kennith H.} and Goldin, {Steven B.} and Greenburg, {A. Gerson}",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsurg.2011.09.012",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "69",
pages = "118--125",
journal = "Journal of Surgical Education",
issn = "1931-7204",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The certifying examination of the american board of surgery

T2 - The effect of improving communication and professional competency: Twenty-year results

AU - Rowland, Pamela

AU - Trus, Thadeus L.

AU - Lang, Nicholas P.

AU - Henriques, Horace

AU - Reed, William P.

AU - Sadighi, Parvis J.

AU - Sutton, John E.

AU - Alseidi, Adnan A.

AU - Cahalane, Michael J.

AU - Gauvin, Jeffrey M.

AU - Pofahl, Walter E.

AU - Sartorelli, Kennith H.

AU - Goldin, Steven B.

AU - Greenburg, A. Gerson

PY - 2012/1/1

Y1 - 2012/1/1

N2 - In 1985, a small research group identified variables affecting applicant success on the oral Certifying Examination (CE) of the American Board of Surgery (ABS). This led to the design of an oral examination course first taught in 1991. The success of and need for this program led to its continuation. The results from the first 10 years were presented at the 2001 Association of Program Directors in Surgery annual meeting. 1 We now report the outcomes for the course of the second 10 years as measured by success on the CE. Thirty-six courses were held over 20 years. There were 57 invited faculty from 27 general surgery programs throughout the United States and Canada. The participant-to-faculty ratio ranged from 16:7 to 5:1 in the newer 3-day format (2007). Courses were offered at sites that replicated the actual examination setting. Each course included (1) pretest and posttest examinations, (2) analysis of case presentation skills, (3) measurement of communication apprehension, (4) 1:1 faculty feedback, (5) small-group practice sessions, (6) individual videotaping, (7) didactic review of specific behaviors on examinations, (8) a debrief session with two faculty members, and (9) a written evaluative summary that included an improvement strategy. There were 36 courses with 326 participants (30-54 years). Follow-up data are available for 225 participants. Trends were analyzed between 1991-2001 and 2002-2011. As resident performance on the CE increased in importance, applicant profiles changed from those who had previously failed (1991-2001) to residents identified by program directors as needing assistance (52%). Since 2002, most course participants (69%) who had failed the CE had completed at least 1 other review course. Participants reported more significant stressors (2002-2011) 9%, but communication apprehension remained the same. As a result, individual counseling for anger and family stressors was integrated into the course. The perception of knowledge deficits was associated with those who enrolled in fellowship training and delayed their examination. The recent groups exhibited more professionalism and articulation issues related to performance. Five surgeons (2002-2011) were asked not to return to the course because of severe knowledge deficiencies or ethical/behavioral issues based on faculty evaluations. Although complete follow-up of all participants was not possible (only 225/326), the success rate among those providing follow-up was 97% for those who followed their remediation plan, giving 218/326, a worse-case pass rate of 67%. Communication and professionalism deficits are still common in those struggling with the CE, Early identification of those at risk of failing by program directors who are documenting the competencies may promote earlier interventions and thus lead to success. This program continues to be effective at identifying behaviors that interfere with success on the CE of the ABS.

AB - In 1985, a small research group identified variables affecting applicant success on the oral Certifying Examination (CE) of the American Board of Surgery (ABS). This led to the design of an oral examination course first taught in 1991. The success of and need for this program led to its continuation. The results from the first 10 years were presented at the 2001 Association of Program Directors in Surgery annual meeting. 1 We now report the outcomes for the course of the second 10 years as measured by success on the CE. Thirty-six courses were held over 20 years. There were 57 invited faculty from 27 general surgery programs throughout the United States and Canada. The participant-to-faculty ratio ranged from 16:7 to 5:1 in the newer 3-day format (2007). Courses were offered at sites that replicated the actual examination setting. Each course included (1) pretest and posttest examinations, (2) analysis of case presentation skills, (3) measurement of communication apprehension, (4) 1:1 faculty feedback, (5) small-group practice sessions, (6) individual videotaping, (7) didactic review of specific behaviors on examinations, (8) a debrief session with two faculty members, and (9) a written evaluative summary that included an improvement strategy. There were 36 courses with 326 participants (30-54 years). Follow-up data are available for 225 participants. Trends were analyzed between 1991-2001 and 2002-2011. As resident performance on the CE increased in importance, applicant profiles changed from those who had previously failed (1991-2001) to residents identified by program directors as needing assistance (52%). Since 2002, most course participants (69%) who had failed the CE had completed at least 1 other review course. Participants reported more significant stressors (2002-2011) 9%, but communication apprehension remained the same. As a result, individual counseling for anger and family stressors was integrated into the course. The perception of knowledge deficits was associated with those who enrolled in fellowship training and delayed their examination. The recent groups exhibited more professionalism and articulation issues related to performance. Five surgeons (2002-2011) were asked not to return to the course because of severe knowledge deficiencies or ethical/behavioral issues based on faculty evaluations. Although complete follow-up of all participants was not possible (only 225/326), the success rate among those providing follow-up was 97% for those who followed their remediation plan, giving 218/326, a worse-case pass rate of 67%. Communication and professionalism deficits are still common in those struggling with the CE, Early identification of those at risk of failing by program directors who are documenting the competencies may promote earlier interventions and thus lead to success. This program continues to be effective at identifying behaviors that interfere with success on the CE of the ABS.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84855171355&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84855171355&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsurg.2011.09.012

DO - 10.1016/j.jsurg.2011.09.012

M3 - Article

C2 - 22208843

AN - SCOPUS:84855171355

VL - 69

SP - 118

EP - 125

JO - Journal of Surgical Education

JF - Journal of Surgical Education

SN - 1931-7204

IS - 1

ER -