The comparative effectiveness of two brief tobacco interventions in the U.S. Air Force

Perceived harm and intentions-to-use of tobacco products

Zoran Bursac, Robert C. Klesges, Melissa A. Little, Brittany D. Linde, Lucy Popova, Cameron Kaplan, Gerald W. Talcott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Brief health prevention programs have been shown efficacious in prevention of tobacco use initiation and re-initiation in the US Air Force. In this manuscript we apply a comparative effectiveness assessment of two published studies, based on testing the equality of effect sizes for perceived harm and intentions-to-use for five tobacco products. METHODS We calculate and compare the effect sizes from the brief tobacco intervention (BTI) study (N=1055) with those of the anti-tobacco media campaign (MEDIA) study (N=665), for perceived harm and intentions-to-use of cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, cigarillos, e-cigarettes and hookah, among Airmen in the US Air Force Technical Training. Univariate and multivariate parametric and non-parametric methods and models were applied to compare the outcomes between the interventions. In addition, we calculate and report the cost of each intervention per Airman. RESULTS Effect sizes for perceived harm were 0.24–0.99 for BTI and 0.17–0.33 for MEDIA, while intentions-to-use effect sizes were 0.14–0.34 for BTI and 0.01–0.07 for MEDIA, depending on the product. BTI intervention effects sizes were significantly greater than MEDIA intervention for all products, mainly among past users, and for both perceived harm (all p<0.0001) and intentions-to-use (all p<0.01). Cost per Airmen was comparable between the two interventions, $14.90 for BTI and $16.52 for MEDIA. CONCLUSIONS Direct comparison suggests that BTI produced effect sizes of significantly higher magnitude in the desired direction for perceived harm and intentions-to-use, for five tobacco products most commonly used by the Airmen, and mainly among past users.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number26
JournalTobacco Induced Diseases
Volume16
Issue numberJune
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2018

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air force
Tobacco Products
nicotine
Tobacco
Air
Smokeless Tobacco
Costs and Cost Analysis
Tobacco Use
technical training
costs
Health
equality
campaign

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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The comparative effectiveness of two brief tobacco interventions in the U.S. Air Force : Perceived harm and intentions-to-use of tobacco products. / Bursac, Zoran; Klesges, Robert C.; Little, Melissa A.; Linde, Brittany D.; Popova, Lucy; Kaplan, Cameron; Talcott, Gerald W.

In: Tobacco Induced Diseases, Vol. 16, No. June, 26, 01.06.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bursac, Zoran ; Klesges, Robert C. ; Little, Melissa A. ; Linde, Brittany D. ; Popova, Lucy ; Kaplan, Cameron ; Talcott, Gerald W. / The comparative effectiveness of two brief tobacco interventions in the U.S. Air Force : Perceived harm and intentions-to-use of tobacco products. In: Tobacco Induced Diseases. 2018 ; Vol. 16, No. June.
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abstract = "INTRODUCTION Brief health prevention programs have been shown efficacious in prevention of tobacco use initiation and re-initiation in the US Air Force. In this manuscript we apply a comparative effectiveness assessment of two published studies, based on testing the equality of effect sizes for perceived harm and intentions-to-use for five tobacco products. METHODS We calculate and compare the effect sizes from the brief tobacco intervention (BTI) study (N=1055) with those of the anti-tobacco media campaign (MEDIA) study (N=665), for perceived harm and intentions-to-use of cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, cigarillos, e-cigarettes and hookah, among Airmen in the US Air Force Technical Training. Univariate and multivariate parametric and non-parametric methods and models were applied to compare the outcomes between the interventions. In addition, we calculate and report the cost of each intervention per Airman. RESULTS Effect sizes for perceived harm were 0.24–0.99 for BTI and 0.17–0.33 for MEDIA, while intentions-to-use effect sizes were 0.14–0.34 for BTI and 0.01–0.07 for MEDIA, depending on the product. BTI intervention effects sizes were significantly greater than MEDIA intervention for all products, mainly among past users, and for both perceived harm (all p<0.0001) and intentions-to-use (all p<0.01). Cost per Airmen was comparable between the two interventions, $14.90 for BTI and $16.52 for MEDIA. CONCLUSIONS Direct comparison suggests that BTI produced effect sizes of significantly higher magnitude in the desired direction for perceived harm and intentions-to-use, for five tobacco products most commonly used by the Airmen, and mainly among past users.",
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AB - INTRODUCTION Brief health prevention programs have been shown efficacious in prevention of tobacco use initiation and re-initiation in the US Air Force. In this manuscript we apply a comparative effectiveness assessment of two published studies, based on testing the equality of effect sizes for perceived harm and intentions-to-use for five tobacco products. METHODS We calculate and compare the effect sizes from the brief tobacco intervention (BTI) study (N=1055) with those of the anti-tobacco media campaign (MEDIA) study (N=665), for perceived harm and intentions-to-use of cigarettes, smokeless tobacco, cigarillos, e-cigarettes and hookah, among Airmen in the US Air Force Technical Training. Univariate and multivariate parametric and non-parametric methods and models were applied to compare the outcomes between the interventions. In addition, we calculate and report the cost of each intervention per Airman. RESULTS Effect sizes for perceived harm were 0.24–0.99 for BTI and 0.17–0.33 for MEDIA, while intentions-to-use effect sizes were 0.14–0.34 for BTI and 0.01–0.07 for MEDIA, depending on the product. BTI intervention effects sizes were significantly greater than MEDIA intervention for all products, mainly among past users, and for both perceived harm (all p<0.0001) and intentions-to-use (all p<0.01). Cost per Airmen was comparable between the two interventions, $14.90 for BTI and $16.52 for MEDIA. CONCLUSIONS Direct comparison suggests that BTI produced effect sizes of significantly higher magnitude in the desired direction for perceived harm and intentions-to-use, for five tobacco products most commonly used by the Airmen, and mainly among past users.

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