The Conservative Evolution of the Vertebrate Basal Ganglia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the traits of the mammalian basal ganglia (BG) that are pertinent to its identification in nonmammals. It reviews the modern findings on the organization of the basal ganglia in each extant vertebrate group and discusses the implications for BG evolution. The chapter reviews that BG evolution in vertebrates reveals that both the striatum and pallidum are ancient structures, both likely present in the jawed fish ancestral to modern jawed vertebrates. Thus, the notion that the pallidum evolved first and is older than the striatum is incorrect. The reason that the terms paleostriatum and neostriatum perpetuate outdated ideas about basal ganglia evolution, their abandonment is recommended. The actual evolutionary history of the basal ganglia seems characterized by an increase in neuron number as the telencephalon expanded during the anamniote-amniote transition, with the elaboration of prominent cortical glutamatergic inputs and midbrain dopaminergic inputs, and an increased role for telencephalic circuitry in motor control occurring in stem amniotes. In mammals, especially the primate lineage, this trend has been accelerated. Nonetheless, the basic direct-indirect pathway circuit plan by which the basal ganglia regulate movement may have already been in place in early anamniotes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHandbook of Behavioral Neuroscience
Pages29-62
Number of pages34
EditionC
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Publication series

NameHandbook of Behavioral Neuroscience
NumberC
Volume20
ISSN (Print)1569-7339

Fingerprint

Basal Ganglia
Vertebrates
Globus Pallidus
Telencephalon
Neostriatum
Mesencephalon
Primates
Mammals
Fishes
History
Neurons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Reiner, A. (2010). The Conservative Evolution of the Vertebrate Basal Ganglia. In Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience (C ed., pp. 29-62). (Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience; Vol. 20, No. C). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-374767-9.00002-0

The Conservative Evolution of the Vertebrate Basal Ganglia. / Reiner, Anton.

Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience. C. ed. 2010. p. 29-62 (Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience; Vol. 20, No. C).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Reiner, A 2010, The Conservative Evolution of the Vertebrate Basal Ganglia. in Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience. C edn, Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience, no. C, vol. 20, pp. 29-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-374767-9.00002-0
Reiner A. The Conservative Evolution of the Vertebrate Basal Ganglia. In Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience. C ed. 2010. p. 29-62. (Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience; C). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-374767-9.00002-0
Reiner, Anton. / The Conservative Evolution of the Vertebrate Basal Ganglia. Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience. C. ed. 2010. pp. 29-62 (Handbook of Behavioral Neuroscience; C).
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